Nefertiti, the Great Royal Wife of the Amarna Period

Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,482
Malaysia
I see with the hypothesis Tadukhipa = Nefertiti a problem in so far as the Mitanni king asks in vain for the sending of full-fledged gold statues (what was originally agreed with Amenhotep III as a price for Tushratta´s daughter), to which Akhenaten initially responded inadequately (probably in deliberate provocation) and then no longer at all. In EA 27 Tushratta writes outraged:

But my brother has not sent the solid gold statues that your father was going to send. You have sent plated ones of wood. Nor have you sent me the goods that your father was going to send me, but you have reduced them greatly.

Considering that one of the statues should represent Tadukhipa, it would be strange under the premise Tadukhipa = Nefertiti that Akhenaten refused to produce and send a fully fledged golden statue and instead sent gold-plated statues, which was not only an insult to Tushratta, but would have been also an insult to Nefertiti if identical to Tadukhipa.
If the gold plated wood statutes were presented as a sign of prudent frugality & austerity, and Akhenaten presented himself as a promoter & proponent of humble monotheism as opposed to extravagant polytheism, perhaps Nefertiti the Mitannian might have been persuaded to not take offence.
 

Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,482
Malaysia
Trying to be as neutral as possible, I'm struggling to find Tutankhaten in any of those images. Could a page and figure number please be given for the images which could be him.

Otherwise, I'll say that as we are looking for someone not older than four or five, how do we without a name tag, or anything else, differentiate between a boy or girl at that age. The images in the article that do show him are from his reign and show his round face, a face not seen in the un-named portraits of those described as princesses, all of which have thinner faces and look nothing like Tutankhaten in what is perhaps the youngest known image, the Nefertem bust, and certainly nothing like the images of him as Amun and Khonsu.
I thought he was supposed to be more like eighteen. His death age, I mean.
 
Apr 2019
184
UK
The intention seems clear that the royal couple took on the attributes of various gods in order to continue a great many traditions. That applies to the protective role of goddesses and also as a focus for worship at home for the general population - who will have been used to worshipping objects not the sun directly. In some ways having the visible sun as a point of veneration actually opens up religion to everyone, but it will have been tough to compete with over a thousand years of tradition. Perhaps in that context it should be no surprise that we see Nefertiti in a great many guises. The great many family scenes recall depictions of Isis and Horus as well. Note of course that in some regions, Nubia for example, Amenhotep III and Tiye were also worshipped as divine beings in their own right in the prior reign, so the concept was not totally new.
 
Apr 2019
184
UK
If the gold plated wood statutes were presented as a sign of prudent frugality & austerity, and Akhenaten presented himself as a promoter & proponent of humble monotheism as opposed to extravagant polytheism, perhaps Nefertiti the Mitannian might have been persuaded to not take offence.
I don't buy that Akhenaten was being frugal at all. He moved the capital city and built an awful lot in a short space of time. The only thought is that all of that expense may have meant he was less keen to use resources on diplomacy. I don't think Akhenaten's form of monotheism was humble at all, if you consider the hundreds of altars piled with offerings, the plush royal palaces and big rewards to loyal subjects.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
3,047
Crows nest
I thought he was supposed to be more like eighteen. His death age, I mean.
At death, yes, but with these busts and other images we are dealing with the period before he became king, so four or five. There are no known images of him before he became king, and he is presented as looking normal in all depictions of him as king.

There is an issue that as he was certainly a close blood relative of the Amarna princesses, if not full brother, and he does not look like a cone head alien, then just how far away from reality are those images of them.
 
Apr 2019
184
UK
I thought I saw his face in the Arnold book shared above but was wrong - it’s a face very similar to Tut but clearly a girl as there’s a large earring. Different face to the busts that may be Kiya as she has a totally different look - the two are side by side. The one that looks like Tut must be a full sister.
 
Mar 2019
399
Ogden, Utah
The female figures which stand embracing the dead Sovereign are clearly identified as Nefertiti Neferneferuaten [© OSIRISNET.NET]. If we remember what has been written about the role that Nefertiti played in her sunshade[2], we can understand such an evolution towards a kind of divine entity. We could put together with this, again, that curious "ghost presence" in the representations of the husband as sphinx: if she was also her protective Goddess ...
Tefnut was often depicted with the head of a lioness.
 
Nov 2016
1,014
Germany
So, there could be the possibility that such a depiction is a kind of "sum" of the symbolic figures of the Royal personages?
I happened for once to stumble across this post during my Marilyn time-out. The lioniness of Tefnut goes back to the worship of this goddess in the city of Leontopolis in the Nile delta, where she appeared in her manifestations as a cute cat and wild lioness (Banner and Hulk, so to speak). Her brother Shu was represented there as a male lion. In Leontopolis it was Shu rather than Tefnut who could also manifest himself as the Eye of Ra. They were joined by a son, Maahes, of course a lion, too. The city got its Greek name because of the lion-like shape of these deities. In Greek times there were real lions in the temples. Different from Wilkinson, Budge and others, who say that Tefnut was a goddess of humidity, today it is recognized that Tefnut was a goddess of fire.

But the lioniness of the two deities seems to have nothing to do with royalty. So I don't think one could see a condensation of royal symbolism in it.
 
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