Ninjas again

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,207
T'Republic of Yorkshire

*Wham*

That's my head hitting the desk. How can an organisation like the BBC publish this crap? It'd be like, oh I don't know, an article about Vikings saying they all wore horned helmets.
 
Nov 2016
1,014
Germany
How can an organisation like the BBC publish this crap?
After all, the text was readable at the end. The internet is full of this story, so the idea itself was brilliant and has made the girl well known, regardless of the mediocre content. Of course, the hype presupposes that the girl looks very sweet - without that the story would probably not have been published in the media. Sex sells, as you know...Perhaps it would have been even more ingenious if the content had been illegible, too, or no ink had been used. After all, Ninja has a lot to do with Zen Buddhism, which places ´emptiness´ at the center of its teaching.

An example from music: John Cage's famous piece 4´33´´ consists, depending on the interpretation, entirely of silence or of the sounds that happen to occur in the environment. The piece is even performed and recorded from time to time...


 
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Lord Fairfax

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
3,401
Changing trains at Terrapin Station...

*Wham*

That's my head hitting the desk. How can an organisation like the BBC publish this crap? It'd be like, oh I don't know, an article about Vikings saying they all wore horned helmets.
She's Japanese, taking a class in Ninja history, writing about her visit to a Ninja museum.
I'd hope that the Japanese would get the facts right, and I'd probably be inclined to defer to their interpretation of their own cultural history.

Do you have more detailed information on this museum or the course?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,207
T'Republic of Yorkshire
She's Japanese, taking a class in Ninja history, writing about her visit to a Ninja museum.
I'd hope that the Japanese would get the facts right, and I'd probably be inclined to defer to their interpretation of their own cultural history.

Do you have more detailed information on this museum or the course?
Trust me, the ninja museum does anything but get the facts right. I've been there.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,207
T'Republic of Yorkshire
After all, the text was readable at the end. The internet is full of this story, so the idea itself was brilliant and has made the girl well known, regardless of the mediocre content. Of course, the hype presupposes that the girl looks very sweet - without that the story would probably not have been published in the media. Sex sells, as you know...Perhaps it would have been even more ingenious if the content had been illegible, too, or no ink had been used. After all, Ninja has a lot to do with Zen Buddhism, which places ´emptiness´ at the center of its teaching.

An example from music: John Cage's famous piece 4´33´´ consists, depending on the interpretation, entirely of silence or of the sounds that happen to occur in the environment. The piece is even performed and recorded from time to time...


The point is not the story about invisible ink. The point is the story gets almost nothing right about ninjas except that the Hollywood depiction is wrong, yet it perpetuates exactly that depiction.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
The point is not the story about invisible ink. The point is the story gets almost nothing right about ninjas except that the Hollywood depiction is wrong, yet it perpetuates exactly that depiction.
Somehow I recall vaguely that the image portrayed by Hollywood was influenced by the works of Hasegawa Settan, a painter from the Edo period. I must have read something about him but don’t recall where.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,207
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Somehow I recall vaguely that the image portrayed by Hollywood was influenced by the works of Hasegawa Settan, a painter from the Edo period. I must have read something about him but don’t recall where.
Do you mean the visual image or the general portrayal?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,207
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Visual image, the black suit. I will try to find it.
Not quite. The visual depiction comes from kabuki theatre. Stagehands would wear those black costumes so the audience knew they were not part of the scenery. An actor who was supposed to be "invisible" or in hiding would also wear the same costume to signal to the audience that he could not be seen. So, any character playing a hidden assassin would therefore wear that costume. The paintings are generally depicting scenes from kabuki.#

The black clad stagehand is called a "kuroko".