No Black Death

Sep 2006
168
#12
MrStoff1989 said:
Without the black plague, We probably wouldn't of gotten the beautiful sonnets of Shakespeare.
How so? Unless Shakespeare lived to see the year 1666, he wouldn't have ever seen a plague epidemic because he lived at least a century and a half or so after the main plague epidemic.
 

Nick

Historum Emeritas
Jul 2006
6,111
UK
#14
If not the plague, some other epidemic would break out sooner or later. It's nature's way of controlling the human population.
 

Nick

Historum Emeritas
Jul 2006
6,111
UK
#18
There may well have been. Every summer in Tudor England minor plague outbreaks would occur in large towns. That was why Elizabeth I spent her summer visiting the country estates of her friends, to escape the threat of infection in London.
 
#19
Well, the Black Death did have many, many, many effects on our modern society. I believe Protestantism could have been a result of the Black Death. Since so many clergy had died the age and experience requirements needed to become one decreaded as well. The new recruits, not been as devoted or learned as the old ones and very corrupt as well, planted the seeds of discontent with the Catholic Church which eventually climaxed with Luther breaking off from the Church.
 
Apr 2008
209
#20
During the course of taking a uni class on the Black Death, I did an annotated bibliography and all the associated requisite research on a particular, and what came to be very interesting, thesis: That the Black Death, through its massive toll in human lives, but more specifically amongst the Catholic clergy, played a large hand in setting up the Reformation. Based on this thesis, which I feel can be backed up to a substantial degree, it's quite easy to conversely put forward the idea that without the Black Death, there may very well have been no Reformation, or at the least nothing bearing resemblance to the OT.
 

Similar History Discussions