No Blacks, No Irish, No Dogs - no facts?

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,600
Europe
I'm not saying there was'nt ANY problems with migrant labour but this is from a book by Angus Bethune Reach who toured the West Riding , Yorkshire in 1849 and wrote about the conditions in the mills and slums. Some locals did complain about wages being driven down but migrant labour was also coming from the depressed south of England agricultural districts too and any complaints about wages were not just about the Irish.

"...[but] my guide informed me that on occasions of differences between the masters and the workmen , English and Irish pulled together in the most brotherly fashion.."

"..Everybody has been most kind to me, and the neighbours come in often....I was born in Shandon Parish, in Cork..."
 
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Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,600
Europe
...more working class solidarity from 1819

The Skelmanthorpe Flag from Yorkshire (early trade union flag, this large banner had to be hidden and was later used in the chartist period too) . The top right is a reference to Peterloo
This is about English labourers but you can see that they are considering labourers outside England too. Bottom left quarter
Hope link works (edit ,sorry can't post picture)



 
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Aug 2011
5,436
Amerikay
I'm not saying there was'nt ANY problems with migrant labour but this is from a book by Angus Bethune Reach who toured the West Riding , Yorkshire in 1849 and wrote about the conditions in the mills and slums. Some locals did complain about wages being driven down but migrant labour was also coming from the depressed south of England agricultural districts too and any complaints about wages were not just about the Irish.

"...[but] my guide informed me that on occasions of differences between the masters and the workmen , English and Irish pulled together in the most brotherly fashion.."

"..Everybody has been most kind to me, and the neighbours come in often....I was born in Shandon Parish, in Cork..."
When job are at stake and wages driven down by migrant groups, discrimination is bound to happen.
 
Dec 2011
3,538
What did they move to London to do? because I suspect the signs may have some basis in 'class'.
One was a trainee teacher, one worked as a bank clerk and one was a junior civil servant. You're right in the sense that they were all lower middle class (my grandfather was a printer and my grandmother a teacher) and this may have been more of a working class scenario.
 

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