Nolan's Dunkirk

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,493
Australia
#21
I have just watched this on Netflix....glad I did not pay to see it at the cinema. The beaches looked almost pristine, modern container cranes in the background, people and vessels way too clean, the spitfires seemed to have access to the Hollywood magic endless ammunition supply and that ridiculous scene hiding in the boat....
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,863
Lisbon, Portugal
#22
I have just watched this on Netflix....glad I did not pay to see it at the cinema. The beaches looked almost pristine, modern container cranes in the background, people and vessels way too clean, the spitfires seemed to have access to the Hollywood magic endless ammunition supply and that ridiculous scene hiding in the boat....
Don't you think movies actually make soldiers more dirty then they really are?
 
Mar 2015
1,286
Yorkshire
#24
This boring movie looks a lot like a copy of Henri Verneuil's 1964 " week end in Zuydcote " but much less talented.
I'm not the only one who finds similarity striking to the point of ridicule.

A damning comparison for Nolan . In fact Henri Verneuil's film, which deals with the same subject, is much better:
:rolleyes:


I went to see it at the cinema and I feel like I've been ripped off by the trailer that promised something else and I have the impression that millions of people are in the same case.
Could not have agreed more - boring and unrealistic.

Why invent stories when there were so many real heroic and not so heroic actions - all much much more impressive than the silly spitfire scenes or the gurgling rubbish in the boat. Even the little boat scenes although better than the others were unrealistic and much better and more representative ones could have been told.

For the record my father thought the bravest man at Dunkirk was a Military Policeman still doing his duty despite the Germans having bypassed his position, armed only with a pistol facing death or at best capture.

This man showed them the best path to take to get across no-mans land (still took about four hours with bullets and shells going off overhead in both directions for for himself and his number two to cross).

BTW, the Mole was all shot up, with huge gaps and his greatest fear was that in the dark he would fall and drown.


.
 
Last edited:
Aug 2018
27
Australia
#25
Was not a fan at all of having my ears blasted for what was essentially an artistic piece on fear and emphasis on that emotion throughout.
The use of real, but not exactly fitting, equipment made it interesting while lacking the sense of scale. The stories themselves were a microcosm of the battle rather than a movie about the battle itself. They tried to show the army, boats rescuing and the the air force without showing the enemy. I cannot remember, but I do not think they showed the French that were rescued.

I wanted to see the old black and white version of Dunkirk when I saw this. The theatre really killed my ears with that damned infernal loud music throughout! The movie is on Netflix here and I will not be re-watching it. No wonder society today has hearing problems.
 
May 2011
13,555
Navan, Ireland
#26
I watched (on DVD) the movie and enjoyed it.

It worth a watch and is more historically accurate than many ( I recognised several incidents that are straight from books I have read) war movies.

But it is a movie not a documentary to 'right the wrong ' of poor Belgium being 'wrongly' blamed for whatever in 1940 or to explain France's defeat in that summer.

I can think of British incidents that were not included -- why were British army shown as a leaderless mob (which some were!) some regiments stayed in order and even in the chaos of defeat most stayed orderly-- read of a line of soldiers going out into the sea in a orderly fashion with junior NCO's and officers keeping order, at the 'head of the line a NCO/junior office over saw the loading of little ships the agreement being he saw a 'fair ' amount onto the boat then hand over to another as he got into a boat, nice and orderly.

There were of course less orderly and even cowardly act-- what do you expect? 'one little ship' rescued one officer-- who took the boat at the point of a gun.

Ever wondered why so little AA fire-- the commander of the British heavy AA guns was the first to Dunkirk with his units , they spiked their guns and were the 'first' home.

But no Leigh-on-Sea Cockle boats? No Stan Hollis? No Royal Engineers and there lorry piers?

The list is endless... its a film not a documentary or even a docudrama (BBC did quite a good one about ten years ago) it can not have everything.

The scene on the train returning home is accurate enough although it wasn't carriages and the beer bottles was actually a whole crate -- a compartment (not an open train) of Tommies are , as in the film, how they'll meet a poor reception in 'Blighty'. A carriage door opens with a civilian in his suit (ready for work of course) opens the door to see the compartment full of exhausted Tommies and in a 'posh' accent (they are North country lads any south of Birmingham that isn't cockney is 'posh')

" Are you boys from Dunkirk?"

group of nods

"Jolly bad show" and shuts the carriage door.

There then commences and argument about the snooty bar steward looking down on them with replies that he'd most likely fought for 4 years in the last one and they'd not lasted a few weeks and his nice home is next etc

At that point the door is flung open and the 'snooty' civilian has a crate of beer and assorted snacks

" Here you are lads get stuck in"

"But , But?.." the confused Tommies stutter

"Ah lads I was in the last one, these thing happen, good to see you back we've got half a chance not you lot are here"

Now I expected in the movie to see an old cliché because I have read the comment in many different accounts said by different people

The senior officer says

'And its our turn next!'

To which the cheerful NCO replies

'Ah well look at it this way at least we've made the final and its a home tie'
 
Last edited:
Aug 2018
27
Australia
#27
Yes I understand that it was a movie. Not a documentary. I personally just would have liked to see the general story rather than the three or four picked sub stories that this director chose. I generally find movies either focus entirely on the negative or visa versa. Rarely are movies well balanced and enjoyable stories.

I did like Kelly's Heroes better than Dunkirk ;) ... I know. I know. Hippies in ww2 that rob banks behind enemy lines do not fit the historical movie brief.
 
Nov 2011
8,771
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
#28
The train in the Nolan Dunkirk film irritated me as the carriage is of the type introduced only in the late 1960s (the Inter-City carriage) with its open plan and picture windows---a typical carriage of the region and period would have had a corridor and individual compartments and leather-strap sash windows. Funny thing--the Bluebell historic line, just ten miles from where they filmed the scene has just such carriages available.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,493
Australia
#29
The train in the Nolan Dunkirk film irritated me as the carriage is of the type introduced only in the late 1960s (the Inter-City carriage) with its open plan and picture windows---a typical carriage of the region and period would have had a corridor and individual compartments and leather-strap sash windows. Funny thing--the Bluebell historic line, just ten miles from where they filmed the scene has just such carriages available.

The attention to detail throughout the movie was pathetic.
 
Feb 2016
4,071
Japan
#30
Didn’t like it.

It was not a war film. It was a thriller/psychological movie. I was promised a British band of brothers... not this. The spitfire scene at the end was annoying.... he drifted endlessly.
 

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