non profits

Port

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
2,077
portland maine
#1
Is it to be expected that non profit organization that tend to pay lower wages ought to have higher expectations about treatment of its employees?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,847
US
#2
Nonprofits are a varied bunch. For example, we have a huge hospital system in my area that is termed "non profit." If you are a highly skilled surgeon, you are being rewarded handsomely by this "non-profit." Traditional non-profits, institutions like churches and social service agencies, traditionally drew people who believed in the cause, so they accepted a lower wage for the common good. Government is technically "non profit." So, government workers are technically "non profit employees. At a local level, their pay was traditionally lower, but the benefits were usually better. Federal workers today make out quite well. In these kind of institutions, one would hope that the directors or leaders would treat their employees based upon the concept of the "Golden Rule." As one who has worked in various nonprofits over the years, I can say this is not always the case. I guess living up to a high standard is not always easy. Local government especially brings in plenty of politics within the workplace, which is often unpleasant.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,831
Dispargum
#3
It depends on what you mean by treatment - how the nonprofit treats you or how the government treats you. For instance, if you work for a church or other religious organization, you have no rights under the Americans With Disabilities Act because Congress wrote an exception for churches into the law. A similar issue came up with the Affordable Care Act - churches don't have to pay for their employees' birth control. So the precedent has been set - churches do not have the same obligations to their employees as other employers do.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,831
Dispargum
#5
There's also a difference between paid employees and volunteers. Paid employees have certain property rights in their incomes and can only be fired for certain specified reasons. Volunteers have no right to volunteer and can be told to stop volunteering at any time for any reason.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,847
US
#6
There's also a difference between paid employees and volunteers. Paid employees have certain property rights in their incomes and can only be fired for certain specified reasons. Volunteers have no right to volunteer and can be told to stop volunteering at any time for any reason.
True. I can't think of a situation where any nonprofit employee would be anything more than an "at will" employee? I know some of the "nonprofit" hospital workers have tried to unionize, but a true, traditional nonprofit? They are all at will, so there not much is needed to let a person go. I would say it happens often, especially among leadership. As they put in years and accrue a larger salary, they often get replaced by a younger person, who will start at less, under the guise of being "fresh blood" and a person with "new ideas."