Normans vs spiders - who would win?

Aug 2011
137
The Castle Anthrax
#14
I don't suppose that they were scared off by pseudoscorpions!
I guess not. Not until they suffered the blasts of their copious flatulence.

Apparently tarantula/tarantulae is Medieval Latin. The Latin word for spider/s is aranea/araneae. I have no idea what exactly tarantula is supposed to mean. It appears that perhaps it described a local spider? A hairy one? And we continue to use that to describe large harry spiders?
 
Feb 2018
164
EU-Germany
#15
tarantula is named after the city of taranto in apulia
it usually is a wolf-spider but early european explorers in the new world started designating many large spiders as tarantulas aswell, but the wolf spiders in south italy(?and sicily) are indeed toxic and can cuase problems but not severe yet if the whole hill, as geoffrey malaterra claims, was covered with them then its similar comfortable as standing in an ant hill

german
Tarantel - Tierdoku
 
Likes: Phalo
Aug 2011
137
The Castle Anthrax
#16
I'm calling bollocks on this story. There's no way spider or scorpion bites caused flatulence. It had to be from something else. Something they ate, something they drank? Surely nature would have selected against any predator whose venom only caused colic in its prey. Not only would their prey have been able to continue to evade, but they would have done so emitting a foul smell as well. Utterly useless.
 
Nov 2010
7,515
Cornwall
#17
I'm calling bollocks on this story. There's no way spider or scorpion bites caused flatulence. It had to be from something else. Something they ate, something they drank? Surely nature would have selected against any predator whose venom only caused colic in its prey. Not only would their prey have been able to continue to evade, but they would have done so emitting a foul smell as well. Utterly useless.
All pissed up probably. Which casts doubt for sure :D
 

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,673
Blachernai
#18
Me too, I was all prepared to spout about another ludicrous thread :lol:.

I was wondering what the original language was. Norman French? Latin? Might help with the interpretation of these beasties. I was also wondering what they meant by 'crossed the sea at Faro'? Do they mean Faro in the Algarve (Al Andalus) or, Faro being a general word for lighthouse, where do they mean?
In the preceding sentence which I didn't quote, Roger and Robert met up at Cosenza. Faro is presumably a locale in Calabria and has a fitting name for a port.
 
#19
I'm calling bollocks on this story. There's no way spider or scorpion bites caused flatulence. It had to be from something else. Something they ate, something they drank? Surely nature would have selected against any predator whose venom only caused colic in its prey. Not only would their prey have been able to continue to evade, but they would have done so emitting a foul smell as well. Utterly useless.
Perhaps you're right, but stings and bites have different effects on different animals, and humans would not be the intended prey of these particular bugs. So if the sting/bite happened to provoke flatulence in a human victim it would not be an evolutionary disadvantage and would perhaps be an advantage in deterring potential predators. But admittedly I haven't heard of flatulence being a side-effect of scorpion or spider bites, and it is possible that these Normans did just have food poisoning.
 

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