North Carolina colonial history

Baltis

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Dec 2011
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Texas
We have a really good thread going on Georgia colonial history and I recently read a book recommended here on the forums by Jax. A really excellent book studying the Tuscarora War in North Carolina in the early 18th century. A couple of things really stood out for me. First, both sides of the conflict were fought primarily by Indians. Naturally the Tuscarora and their allies were on one side but, North Carolina was incapable of putting out much of a militia. As a result, they got troops from South Carolina which consisted primarily of Yamasee and other warriors fighting alongside the colonists.

Another feature I found a bit chilling was the emphasis on Indian slavery. The South Carolinians were motivated to fight by the opportunity to take Indian slaves from the North Carolina tribes and then either use or sell them as plunder. I had known previously that Indians were used as slaves in the early days of slavery but the scale and impact on those tribes of eastern North Carolina was beyond what I had previously thought.

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/The-Tuscarora-War-Settlers-Carolina/dp/1469610906/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1385219370&sr=8-1&keywords=Tuscarora+war"]The Tuscarora War: Indians, Settlers, and the Fight for the Carolina Colonies: David La Vere: 9781469610900: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513UaSBmErL.@@AMEPARAM@@513UaSBmErL[/ame]
 

Jax Historian

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Jul 2012
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Glad you enjoyed it, Baltis, it was eye opening for me as well. Serious research on Indian slavery is less than two decades old but is growing stronger. I'm sure we'll be seeing much more on the subject in the coming years.
 

Baltis

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Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
Glad you enjoyed it, Baltis, it was eye opening for me as well. Serious research on Indian slavery is less than two decades old but is growing stronger. I'm sure we'll be seeing much more on the subject in the coming years.
The book was well written and organized in a really interesting way with each chapter introducing a new player to the drama. I went through it very quickly. :)
 

Jax Historian

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Jul 2012
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Although off the topic of North Carolina and only slightly addressing Indian slavery, you might also enjoy this book on colonist-Indian relations in the early days of Georgia. It didn't play into my recent research on Georgia, but I found it very interesting...

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Negotiating-Georgia-British-Creek-Relations-1733-1752/dp/0820326755/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1385222060&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=negotiating+for+geogia"]Negotiating for Georgia: British-Creek Relations in the Trustee Era, 1733-1752: Julie Anne Sweet: 9780820326757: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513B66BHZFL.@@AMEPARAM@@513B66BHZFL[/ame]
 

Baltis

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Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
Since I got the Tuscarora book out of the Georgia thread it only seems appropriate to get a Georgia book out of the North Carolina thread. :)

But, there should be some really interesting topics available to those interested in the early days of North Carolina. Particularly with the Proprietor years.

As I understand things, the earliest plantations in NC were actually a bit of border spill over from Virginia. Particularly after Bacon's Rebellion there were a few folk who just felta little more comfortable outside the VA jurisdiction. :)

Anyway, a few topics for early NC would include:

The Roanoke Colony
Blackbeard
Insurrection in the 1690s
Quakers in the colony & their impact on politics
Tuscarora War
Settling the backcountry - Daniel Boone, etc.
Royal Highlanders & Moore's Creek Bridge
Loyalists in North Carolina
Patriots of North Carolina

I'm sure I missed a few but would like to include a further category.

Shipwrecks

And to add a little family history here. I am a Ming descendant. In this case, the Mings were a family of Irish sea captains with a long history that included sailing in and out of Bermuda during the early 17th century. In fact, David Ming first arrived in Bermuda in 1612 and was buried on Coopers Island in 1674. His son, Joseph Ming was wrecked off Cape Hatteras in 1701 trying to bring in a load of colonists. He managed to land some 24 people and was awarded 200 acres of land near Bath at the top of Pamlico Sound where the river meets the sound. Bath was the first town incorporated in NC (1705). Joseph died in 1707 but his wife, Sarah Ming, and the children continued to live there.

Young Joseph, Jr. would be my 7th Gr Grandfather and a teenager at the time. And just think, a teen with front row seats to the last battle of Blackbeard. :)
 

Jax Historian

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Jul 2012
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I'm particularly interested in the Quakers of NC. I know only a bit about them being there (as I only know a bit about some being in Georgia). Most of what I know about them is that didn't last long in these regions, most headed North in light of their views on slavery. The few primary sources I could find (admittedly I looked very briefly) only spoke to their local Quaker meetings.

I'd like to hear what you know about their impact on North Carolina politics and anything else they contributed to NC society.
 

Baltis

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Dec 2011
4,005
Texas
During the Tuscarora War there were enough Quakers in Albermarle County to seriously hamper the colony from organizing any assistance to the war effort. Their anti-war sentiment ran so deep as to refuse efforts to feed and supply the army.

One interesting item used against them in government was the Quaker belief that no oaths should be taken. At some point along the way, Anglicans instituted a requirement that an oath be taken along with voting or to sit in the Assembly. This tended to keep them out of government office.
 

Jax Historian

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Jul 2012
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During the Tuscarora War there were enough Quakers in Albermarle County to seriously hamper the colony from organizing any assistance to the war effort. Their anti-war sentiment ran so deep as to refuse efforts to feed and supply the army.

One interesting item used against them in government was the Quaker belief that no oaths should be taken. At some point along the way, Anglicans instituted a requirement that an oath be taken along with voting or to sit in the Assembly. This tended to keep them out of government office.
That makes perfect sense. Quaker pacifism (although not Quakers adhered to it) and their defiance against swearing oaths shows up several times in their history. Thanks for the info.
 
Nov 2012
1,700
Whatever happened to Indians taken as slaves in the early colonial days? You hear about Indians being taken prisoner, but then not much after that point, and nothing a century later, when slavery was always explicitly defined as African or "negro" slavery. I wonder happened to the descendants of Indian captives taken as slaves, if there were any. Would I be correct in guessing that exposure to disease from increased contact with Europeans probably killed most of the captives, similar to why enslavement of Indians was abandoned in the Caribbean?
 
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Pendennis

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Mar 2013
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Kirkcaldy, Scotland
Baltis and Jax don't forget that Native American Chief Standwattie fought for the slavery supporting Confederacy during the war of 1861-65.
On North Carolina , as s Scotsman I am very interested in the strong Scottish colonial conection between my country and North Carolina.
On the eve of the War of Independence in 1776 there were 10,000 speaking Gaelic Scottish Highlanders(Gaelic-not English was their first language) living in Cumberland County, North Carolina.
Scottish historical heroine Flora McDonald of Skye, who helped Bonnei Prince Charlie escape the Redcoats after the failed 1745-46 Jacobite Rebellion emigrated to North Carolina with her sons from Skye, Scotland.
However, once the 13 colonies rebelled in 1776 Flora and her sons strangely, supported the Loyalist pro -British side and she returned to Scotland.
Similarly, in his oft filmed novel ''Kidnapped'' Scottish novelist Robert Louis Stevenson mentions in that book that David Balfour's villainous Uncle Ebenzer paid the equally villlanious ship's Captain Hoseason to take the Kidnapped hero Balfour to North Carolina where he would be sold as an indentured servant.
Finally, there is some place in North Carolina called ''Mountain? where they annually have one of the biggest Highland Games in the USA.
I have American friends in Alabama of Scottish descent who travel there to play the bagpipes and enjoy the social whirl.
So North Carolina has close historical links with Bonnie Scotland.