North Carolina colonial history

Jul 2013
4
Western New York
#11
I don't know how much help this will be, but in my school library we have "Colonial History Series" all written in the 70s. I read the one by Eugenia Burney back in September, it was quite informative about the beginnings of NC and the Lord Proprietors, explaining which Native American tribes lived where in the state and how they lived, etc. I found it very informative for a 150(ish) page overview. It also explained some on the Tuscarora War and fighting taking place during the Revolution. The fights between the Scottish Loyalists and the Patriots, and how different parts were fighting over insurrection. It covered Flora McDonald and Blackbeard as well. So for a book written 40 years ago it was very good in my opinion. I'm not sure how easy it is to get though. :/

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4343674-colonial-north-carolina?ac=1
 
Last edited:
Apr 2010
1,030
evergreen state, USA
#12
My direct maternal line was in North carolina from no later than 1750 to after the Revolutionary War. But I have uncovered very little information on them in that era. They started out on Long Island when the Dutch still ruled there. Although they came from England (PuritanS? Quakers?), they joined the Presbyterian church (more acceptable to Peter Stuyvesant). Later, they moved to New Jersey, where they mixed in with Scots people who came in via Monmouth. They were still Presbyterians. After a land ownership dispute (Cox Affair), there was a movement of many of them down to Virginia and on to North carolina. In the area around Rockingham (Richmond County) they must have intermingled with the Scotch Presbyterians expanding westward from the Cape Fear River region. So my question is, do I have any DNA connection to those Cape Fear River Scotch? There are missing ancestors in my tree from that time. After the Revolutionary War, many of those Scotch people were deported or left voluntarily.
:deadhorse:
 
Last edited:
Jul 2019
1
California
#13
Since I got the Tuscarora book out of the Georgia thread it only seems appropriate to get a Georgia book out of the North Carolina thread. :)

But, there should be some really interesting topics available to those interested in the early days of North Carolina. Particularly with the Proprietor years.

As I understand things, the earliest plantations in NC were actually a bit of border spill over from Virginia. Particularly after Bacon's Rebellion there were a few folk who just felta little more comfortable outside the VA jurisdiction. :)

Anyway, a few topics for early NC would include:

The Roanoke Colony
Blackbeard
Insurrection in the 1690s
Quakers in the colony & their impact on politics
Tuscarora War
Settling the backcountry - Daniel Boone, etc.
Royal Highlanders & Moore's Creek Bridge
Loyalists in North Carolina
Patriots of North Carolina

I'm sure I missed a few but would like to include a further category.

Shipwrecks

And to add a little family history here. I am a Ming descendant. In this case, the Mings were a family of Irish sea captains with a long history that included sailing in and out of Bermuda during the early 17th century. In fact, David Ming first arrived in Bermuda in 1612 and was buried on Coopers Island in 1674. His son, Joseph Ming was wrecked off Cape Hatteras in 1701 trying to bring in a load of colonists. He managed to land some 24 people and was awarded 200 acres of land near Bath at the top of Pamlico Sound where the river meets the sound. Bath was the first town incorporated in NC (1705). Joseph died in 1707 but his wife, Sarah Ming, and the children continued to live there.

Young Joseph, Jr. would be my 7th Gr Grandfather and a teenager at the time. And just think, a teen with front row seats to the last battle of Blackbeard. :)
Hello, I too am a Ming! If I did my tree right šŸ¤žšŸ» Your David Ming would be my 9th great grandfather. Iā€™m new to ancestry but enjoy the history of my heritage and history in general. I was hoping that maybe you would have any information on our history of where we are from, did we fight in wars ? Etc read your post makes me believe we have a interest family history to explore. Thank you in advance
Jessica
 
Apr 2010
1,030
evergreen state, USA
#14
My direct maternal line was in North carolina from no later than 1750 to after the Revolutionary War. But I have uncovered very little information on them in that era. They started out on Long Island when the Dutch still ruled there. Although they came from England (PuritanS? Quakers?), they joined the Presbyterian church (more acceptable to Peter Stuyvesant). Later, they moved to New Jersey, where they mixed in with Scots people who came in via Monmouth. They were still Presbyterians. After a land ownership dispute (Cox Affair), there was a movement of many of them down to Virginia and on to North carolina. In the area around Rockingham (Richmond County) they must have intermingled with the Scotch Presbyterians expanding westward from the Cape Fear River region. So my question is, do I have any DNA connection to those Cape Fear River Scotch? There are missing ancestors in my tree from that time. After the Revolutionary War, many of those Scotch people were deported or left voluntarily.
:deadhorse:
I hate to admit it, but I was wrong about this relationship being my direct maternal line. As it turned out, I had the wrong brother in a large family as in my line. Consider the above as a fairy tale, although those events occurred for some other people. My tree has now been corrected for quite a while. My corrected direct maternal line line starts in Virginia, and then to Kentucky > Indiana > and westward ho!
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,713
Sydney
#15
is it true that during the War of the States , North Carolina troops had some reluctance into moving out of Virginia
they also had the reputation of not being too enthusiastic in carrying fighting by 1864
with a sizable number of the soldiers deciding to go home to take care of their destitute families
 

Similar History Discussions