Northernmost Native-American Agricultural People?

Aug 2016
977
US&A
#1
I've been looking into building a worm farm as a way of disposing of dog poop. While researching that, I learned that the latitudes between 45 and 69 degrees in Northern North America have no native worm species. They all went extinct 11,000 years ago.

Of course, we now have tons of invasive worm species, mostly from Europe and Asia. While they hurt our forests, who aren't used to them, they are usually a boon for farmers and gardeners like me.

Learning that made me realize that most Northern Native-American Peoples didn't farm much. I wonder if that is at least partly due to lack of worms.

What Native-American People were the northernmost farmers?
 
Likes: Haakbus

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,933
Dispargum
#2
Most of the US is south of 45 degrees N latitude. Most Indians in the future Eastern US did grow crops, but your theory of earthworms north of 45 degrees might still hold true. 45 degrees is the northern border of Vermont and New York, so the lack of earthworms would only effect Canada and the northern tip of Maine. By the time you get out to North Dakota and Montana the Indians were mostly hunter gatherers, not farmers. I do recall reading that France had a hard time establishing agriculture in the Quebec and Montreal areas. I'd always thought it was because of the cold climate, but I suppose a lack of earthworms could have something to do with it, too.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,717
United States
#3
Yeah basically the entire eastern half of the US was agricultural (with the exception of the too swampy parts of Florida IIRC) up to the St. Lawrence River or so.

Looks like the Iroquois and their immediate neighbors were probably the furthest north they had farming, since the people just north of that, the Cree, were foragers.
 
Aug 2018
375
Southern Indiana
#4
Northern tribes (think Canada) did not do much farming. If they were far enough south, they grew corn, squash and beans, but tribes farther north mostly collected wild rice and foraged instead of farming.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,107
#5
The line of agriculture ran northeast / southwest. For example, tribes in New York and New England were partly agricultural.

Native Americans planted crops but did not have much domesticated animals.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,717
United States
#6
The line of agriculture ran northeast / southwest. For example, tribes in New York and New England were partly agricultural.

Native Americans planted crops but did not have much domesticated animals.
Yeah because by the time agriculture started in the Americas, pretty much all the large animals that could potentially be domesticated had died off. North of Mesoamerica only the dog was domesticated.
 
Aug 2018
375
Southern Indiana
#7
Orchards are frequently mentioned with Eastern woodland tribes, mostly apple and peach from what I've read, but unfortunately most of the time the sources simply refer to them as "orchards". I am always curious if they encouraged groves of walnuts, persimmons, paw paws, crabapple and other native fruit trees. Sugar maple was very prized and important. Turkeys were kept, dogs were used for food and other purposes. After the whites arrived they quickly learned to keep chickens. Some tribes even kept some cows. I guess I went off subject.
 
Sep 2012
1,022
Tarkington, Texas
#9
The California tribes foraged for acorns and nuts and ate a lot of fish. The arrival of the Spanish brought huge herds of cattle. California soon became famous for its large Grizzy Bears. The Anglo settlers soon got rid of the Grizzlies, but they were around long enough to be featured on the California state flag.

Pruitt