Obscure Wars

Jan 2010
3,983
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#41
I'm in the U.S., and I'm better-read than most of my countrymen (false modesty aside), and I can tell you almost nobody knows about the GNW or the South American wars, at least outside of academia. Pop culture portrays every country south of Texas as mariachi music and periodic revolutions. Sweden? Those guys are always neutral, right?:confused:
Sam--see my comment immediately above. I'm not in academia, but I'm familiar with all three.
 
Jan 2010
3,983
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#42
. . .
I am in Portugal, and I don’t know much about the American Civil War or about WWII. Is the American Civil War an obscure one? Is WWII and obscure war?

For instance King Arthur makes plenty of appearances in the pop culture. But he is one of the most known obscure kings of history! The Wars of king Arthur… those are quite obscure!

That was what I was trying to say with the previous comment.
Tulius--unless you meant the comment on the American Civil War and WWII to be tongue in cheek, you've got to be kidding! Especially WWII.

What wars would you say were not obscure, if those two are?
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
4,867
Canary Islands-Spain
#43
I'm sure he wanted to say: "the fact that I don't know that much about those wars, doesn't mean they are obscure at all".
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,083
Portugal
#44
and 'obscure' can be regional. I'm sure many Paraguayans know about the triple alliance war and not much about the US Civil War.
Yes, in a way, wars obscure for one society are not obscure for others. But even on those many times the information is there, is available if you go to the Net or to the local library. So they are obscure to you or to me just because we never really care to look at it.

Tulius--unless you meant the comment on the American Civil War and WWII to be tongue in cheek, you've got to be kidding! Especially WWII.

What wars would you say were not obscure, if those two are?
Frank gave the correct explanation, I was answering to sailorsam, and he said that he is from the USA. I picked probably the two most well known wars in the USA, to state that the fact that if I, or anybody else, don’t know much about them, that doesn’t make them obscure.

All of this to say that that, in my opinion, the wars that are truly obscure are the ones that you want to know about them, but you don’t have answers. You don’t have much easy available information in the Net or books in the local library, because the world historiography never really cared much about them, even in generic Universal History books, and even if there are reasonable available sources.

Or, in other perspective, wars that are even obscure for the historians because they don’t have enough sources, or they have some sources but the sources don’t really talking to them.

Examples,

For the first case, not really a war, but a military expedition that has plenty of sources but I never saw them much fully explored and treated by the historiography: the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition or the Spanish Expedition in Cambodia. Or the curious and already mentioned short war between the UK and Zanzibar. You really have to dig to find about them.

For the second case there can be stated numerous examples, the already mentioned King Arthur, the Siege of Troy, Siege of Jericho, some parts of the Campaign of Alexander the Great (Gaza, India…)… all the proto-historic wars…

I'm sure he wanted to say: "the fact that I don't know that much about those wars, doesn't mean they are obscure at all".
Exactly. Thanks Frank!
 
#45
The British invasions of the Rio de la Plata in 1806-07 - they tried twice to capture Buenos Aires but they failed. (They succeeded in Montevideo in between those attempts, though, but that was cut short by the failure of the second attempt at Buenos Aires.) It paved the way indirectly to Argentine independence because the people in Buenos Aires beat the British without much Spanish help and gained confidence that way.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2014
1,375
world
#46
One of the most "obscure war" nomination would be revolt of Ngyarong Khampas against the Qing dynsaty and Galden Phodrong in the 1840s to 1860. The Ngyarong warlord Gombo Namgyel successfully united the Khampa tribes for the first time after the fragmentation of the Tibetan empire. He defeated the Qing and chased them out. The kings of Derge and Lingstang were defeated and chased out. Bathang and lathang surrendered.

The rebellion was quite succesfull until the warlord Gombo Namgyel boasted that the he would invade Lhasa and loot the statues of Jho and bring it back to his homeland. After that Lhasa army mobilised and by bribery and warfare defeated the khampas and occupied ngyarong. Huge areas of Kham would be ruled/administered by Lhasa until the 1930s. Many khampas would convert to Yellow hat sect.

This war is the reason there is so many yellow hat sect in Aba and Ganzi today.
 
Likes: Futurist
Dec 2017
176
Regnum Teutonicum
#47
Obscure wars I would like to learn more about are for example the Soviet-Lithuanian War, the War of American Independence or the Triple Alliance War. Not a war, but I just found out, that Norway invaded and annexed a part of Denmark in 1931. I didn't know that.
 
Dec 2014
5,876
Spain
#48
The British invasions of the Rio de la Plata in 1806-07 - they tried twice to capture Buenos Aires but they failed. (They succeeded in Montevideo in between those attempts, though, but that was cut short by the failure of the second attempt at Buenos Aires.) It paved the way indirectly to Argentine independence because the people in Buenos Aires beat the British without much Spanish help and gained confidence that way.
Not at all... We can read the name of the units and the officers.... and in with side they fought in the Wars.... Argentina became independent after Napoleon invaded Spain...Argentina not even existed. It was the Viceroy of El Plata and the people divided into Royalist and Rebels.
 

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