Online resources for studying Byzantine history

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,745
Blachernai
#1
This short list is designed to give some pointers on where to find material for studying Byzantium on the internet. Most of what is available here is free, but a few things require some sort of subscription. By no means is this an attempt to be exhaustive: the online publications of Dumbarton Oaks alone would surpass this list in size, and trying to collect every last book that has been released without copyright and every open-access paper would be a fool's errand. As always, Academia.edu is your best source for free articles, and Archive.org has a vast collection of out of copyright texts, many of which are still relevant today.


General


Pinakes: a powerful tool for searching manuscript catalogues: Pinakes | ??????? Institut de Recherche et d'histoire des textes

Mary Jaharis Centre: the place to go to find out what’s happening in the field: https://maryjahariscenter.org/

ORBIS: Stanford University’s route-mapping tool for the Roman world. Plenty of fun, but needs to be used carefully for the middle ages: ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World

Byzantium 1200: Digital re-creation of Constantinople: Byzantium 1200

A variety of links on Byzantine studies things on the internet: The Byzantine Society*>*Links*>*Links


Free Journals


Echos d’Orient became Revue des études byzantines in 1946, is available down to 2011: Revue des études byzantines - Persée

Symmeikta is important Byzantine studies journal. Originally mainly in modern Greek, but now in many languages: https://ejournals.epublishing.ekt.gr/index.php/bz

Parekbolai is an open-access journal of Byzantine literature: https://ejournals.lib.auth.gr/parekbolai/index

Some issues of ZRVI, the Serbian journal of Byzantine studies available here: Online Editions | The Institute for Byzantine Studies

Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies covers a lot, and is available from issue 1 (1958) here: https://grbs.library.duke.edu/


Databases


Database of translated texts, operated by Princeton University: Modern Language Translations of Byzantine Sources | Modern Language Translations of Byzantine Sources</br>Digitized Greek Manuscripts

Database of digitized Greek manuscripts, operated by Princeton University: Digitized Greek Manuscripts | Modern Language Translations of Byzantine Sources</br>Digitized Greek Manuscripts

Online Catalogue of Byzantine Seals: the ongoing effort of Dumbarton Oaks to catalogue their massive collection: https://www.doaks.org/resources/seals

RI OPAC: A vast bibliographical database that is particularly strong in non-English publications. Unfortunately, not very good for performing general queries. RI OPAC

Monumenta Germaniae Historica: Vast collection of texts that includes a lot on Byzantium. Not user-friendly. dMGH | Suche

Thesaurus Linguae Graecae: only limited parts of this are free, but it’s a database containing thousands of Greek texts and the main lexical tools: TLG - Home

Prosopography of the Byzantine Empire (641-867): Intended to follow up the Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, this project eventually died out and was replaced by others, but is archived here: Welcome | Prosopography of the Byzantine Empire

Prosopography of the Byzantine World (1025-1180): Updated version of the old 2006 database by the same name. https://pbw2016.kdl.kcl.ac.uk/

Prosopographie der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit: The prosopograpical tool for middle Byzantine history, 641-1025. Unfortunately not free. In German. https://www.degruyter.com/view/db/pmbz


Translations

The Internet Medieval Sourcebook has a wide range of texts available. However, keep in mind that some of these translations are not always the most recent. https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/Halsall/sbook1c.asp

Weird site, but has Charlotte Roueché’s translation of Kekavmenos, the 11th c. statesman and grump: SAWS

Translation of the 10th c. Byzantine lexicon known as the Suda: Stoa | Welcome to the Suda On Line (SOL)

Holy Women of Byzantium, ten saints’ lives published by Dumbarton Oaks: https://www.doaks.org/research/publications/books/holy-women-of-byzantium-ten-saintsa-lives-in


Select publications

Alexei Lidov’s ‘Hierotopy’ Hierotopy (book) | Hierotopy

The Glory of Byzantium, 843-1261. Catalogue from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/metpu...lture_of_the_Middle_Byzantine_Era_AD_843_1261

Byzantium, Faith and Power, 1261-1557. Catalogue from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/metpublications/byzantium_faith_and_power_1261_1557

Recent Research on Byzantine Jewelry, by the British Museum: British Museum - Intelligible Beauty: recent research on Byzantine jewellery

Some digital publications by the Serbian Academy of Sciences: Online Editions | The Institute for Byzantine Studies

The Economic History of Byzantium, three large volumes: https://www.doaks.org/research/publications/books/the-economic-history-of-byzantium


The Commonwealth


Syri.ac is a massive portal for all things pertaining to Syriac studies is very well-curated and organized. syri.ac | An annotated bibliography of Syriac resources online

Detailed catalogue for Syriac prosopography and religion: Syriaca.org: The Syriac Reference Portal

Robert Bedrosian has collected a wide range of material pertaining to medieval Armenia and has translated many sources, all available on his site: http://rbedrosian.com/site_index.html
 

Tsar

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
2,010
Serbia
#10
Is there some way I can retain editing power over the first post so I can update this?
You can't unless maybe a mod or the admin wants to modify it. My suggestion is to write this in the form of a blog post. As far as I see, you can modify your blog posts infinitely.
 

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