Orwell - Politics in the English Language

EmperorTigerstar

Ad Honorem
Jun 2013
6,398
USA
George Orwell: Politics and the English Language

^ Full text online (not a file, it's on the page)

This is my favorite essay written by George Orwell. He talks about that certain way of English that politicians and news people use and the essay is at a time where Orwell has not written 1984 yet but clearly he has his preliminary ideas over Newspeak.

Anyone else enjoy this one?
 

David Vagamundo

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,439
Atlanta, Georgia USA
I didn't enjoy it because I can see that my own writing incorporates much of what he criticizes.
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,151
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
I liked that particular essay very much. He articulated many ideas that I as an inarticulate youngster was desperate to form and utter.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,748
Australia
Orwell's six rules are more relevant today than ever before. I only wish I could follow them more closely.
 

EmperorTigerstar

Ad Honorem
Jun 2013
6,398
USA
I didn't enjoy it because I can see that my own writing incorporates much of what he criticizes.
Heh. I think all of our writings do at some point. That's why we evolve our styles. Hopefully.

I liked that particular essay very much. He articulated many ideas that I as an inarticulate youngster was desperate to form and utter.
I know what you mean. He's great at that.

Orwell's six rules are more relevant today than ever before. I only wish I could follow them more closely.
My senior year English teacher actually gave us a printed copy of those but I sadly lost mine. I'll have to reprint it when I can.
 

Pacific_Victory

Ad Honorem
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
His point that it is often easier to simply make up a new word using a Latin root, than to search for an equivalent Anglo-Saxon word is something I'm often guilty of myself.
 

Pacific_Victory

Ad Honorem
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
Also, his point that:

When one watches some tired hack on the platform mechanically repeating the familiar phrases — bestial, atrocities, iron heel, bloodstained tyranny, free peoples of the world, stand shoulder to shoulder — one often has a curious feeling that one is not watching a live human being but some kind of dummy: a feeling which suddenly becomes stronger at moments when the light catches the speaker's spectacles and turns them into blank discs which seem to have no eyes behind them. And this is not altogether fanciful. A speaker who uses that kind of phraseology has gone some distance toward turning himself into a machine. The appropriate noises are coming out of his larynx, but his brain is not involved, as it would be if he were choosing his words for himself.
Is the best description of political speech I've ever read. Wonderful!
 

Ancientgeezer

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
8,898
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
"Nineteen-Eight-Four" is treated as a how-to guide by the BBC and British and European politicians, not as a warning.