Other examples like Pompeji and Herculaneum

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
Has sometimes given it a thought: There are those two famous towns exposed to an ancient disaster. Then it is like it is it. So far as there are other towns or settlements or anything like them, they are not at all as known. On the other hand there seems to be not any reason to think their end was unique. On the contrary, I find we have every good reason to thin something like what happened there has happened again and again. Volcanoes and other sources of disaster after all is not only older than humanity, but older than earth itself. So, should we expect there are lots of unexplored places of disaster, where archaeologists and others may find treasures of knowledge (though we should not forget at the cost of past tragedies) of the past? I think I would guess so.
 

fascinating

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,405
Has sometimes given it a thought: There are those two famous towns exposed to an ancient disaster. Then it is like it is it. So far as there are other towns or settlements or anything like them, they are not at all as known. On the other hand there seems to be not any reason to think their end was unique. On the contrary, I find we have every good reason to thin something like what happened there has happened again and again. Volcanoes and other sources of disaster after all is not only older than humanity, but older than earth itself. So, should we expect there are lots of unexplored places of disaster, where archaeologists and others may find treasures of knowledge (though we should not forget at the cost of past tragedies) of the past? I think I would guess so.
There are the towns of Oplontis and Stabiae in the same area and buried at the same time. If I am not wrong they are still being excavated, though they are smaller than P and H, I think.

I am not expecting the finding of such town-sized ancient remains so well preserved. The unique way Herculaneum was buried has enabled preservation of organic matter such as wooden furniture, some paper, and even (fossilised) food. This is not the case in a town flooded by the sea. The fact that volcanoes are older than humanity is no use because we are here interested in artefacts left by humanity.

It would be nice if you took the trouble to ensure the correct spelling in the title.
 

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
There are the towns of Oplontis and Stabiae in the same area and buried at the same time. If I am not wrong they are still being excavated, though they are smaller than P and H, I think.

I am not expecting the finding of such town-sized ancient remains so well preserved. The unique way Herculaneum was buried has enabled preservation of organic matter such as wooden furniture, some paper, and even (fossilised) food. This is not the case in a town flooded by the sea. The fact that volcanoes are older than humanity is no use because we are here interested in artefacts left by humanity.

It would be nice if you took the trouble to ensure the correct spelling in the title.
Sorry. I think we don´t spell the names excactly as it is done in english texts.
The fact that there has been volcanoes as long as there were humans and even much longer is that I see this as an indication there could be other, probably yet undiscovered sites, preserved just as well as those mentioned in the title. I would guess there has been hundreds of eruptions not so different from the one in AD 79 all over the planet in the era of Homo Sapiens.
 

Todd Feinman

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
6,563
Planet Nine, Oregon
What was left at Akrotiri was well preserved:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akrotiri_(Santorini)
"In regards to furniture, the volcanic ash which engulfed the city often penetrated into the houses in large quantities, and in these layers of fine volcanic dust, produced negatives of the disintegrated wooden objects. Using these negatives as molds, liquid Plaster-of-Paris can be poured in and produce casts of parts or even entire pieces of furniture such as beds, tables, chairs, or stools. Offering tables are one of the most common finds in Akrotiri, and were either made of clay or coated with plaster, decorated in the same technique as the wall paintings, and only consisted of three highly decorated legs and a top."
 

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
"In regards to furniture, the volcanic ash which engulfed the city often penetrated into the houses in large quantities, and in these layers of fine volcanic dust, produced negatives of the disintegrated wooden objects. Using these negatives as molds, liquid Plaster-of-Paris can be poured in and produce casts of parts or even entire pieces of furniture such as beds, tables, chairs, or stools. Offering tables are one of the most common finds in Akrotiri, and were either made of clay or coated with plaster, decorated in the same technique as the wall paintings, and only consisted of three highly decorated legs and a top."
I am curious how fast things decay at such places. If most could be in a relatively good shape after, say not 3000 years but perhaps 30000 or even much more.
 

Todd Feinman

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
6,563
Planet Nine, Oregon
I am curious how fast things decay at such places. If most could be in a relatively good shape after, say not 3000 years but perhaps 30000 or even much more.
Good question, and I don't know the answer! It might be able to be found..