Overpopulation and aging population?

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,725
San Antonio, Tx
#51
When we think about overpopulation, the first think that comes to mind is the loss of fresh water. I recall reading that by the year 2025 many parts of the world will be facing fresh water crisis, due to the higher numbers and all the contaminated water sources that humans are causing. But, in time, the very factors that overpopulation creates will decrease our numbers. Overpopulation will result in epidemics that will decrease our numbers.
This is an interesting point. There is exactly the same amount of fresh water in the world today than there was a 1,000 years ago, perhaps longer. It hasn’t changed except for minuscule quantities of salt water conversion. Pollution is of course a problem, but the greater problem is access to fresh water especially in the Third World which also has the greatest overpopulation challenges.

Some aquifers, such as in Saudi Arabia, are non-renewable, meaning that once it’s gone, it’s gone. Others renew and re-load through groundwater replenishment and percolation.

There are probably regions in the world where overpopulation puts tremendous stress on the water supply. There is probably an equation that can (and has already been) made where overpopulation outstrips nature’s capacity to supply adequate fresh water. This is especially true in Sub-Saharan Africa and India. Don’t know what China’s situation is.
 
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royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,725
San Antonio, Tx
#52
In my area the trades (construction, electricians, welders, etc.) are desperately trying to recruit young people for upcoming construction. The majority of the tradesmen are getting near retirement age. Many young adults I know don't consider the trades, which can pay really well, more so than many college degrees - without the debt. In general, with the aging process, more people will be needed to attend to these elderly persons needs: food service, health care, personal care attendants, ad other service providers.
Agreed. This has been happening for some time now.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
12,542
#53
The role of immigration - both documented and undocumented - is very important here. Immigration helps restore the “Bell Curve” of countries whose population is aging. This is especially true in Canada and the US which are desirable destinations for immigrants both because they are relatively empty countries, relatively wealthy ones, and where individual initiative can make a dramatic difference in people’s lives.
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No it does not... Its a classic case of kicking the can down the road, or of a pyramid if you prefer.... For if you bring in -say- 3 immigrants to cover the retirement of one local, you'll need in the future to bring in 9 more immigrants to cover the retirement of these 3, then 27 more etc...... This is clearly an unstainable model
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
12,542
#54
This is an interesting point. There is exactly the same amount of fresh water in the world today than there was a 1,000 years ago, perhaps longer. .
This may be true.... but comsumption is vastly higher in all areas.... starting from the fact that almost no one had running water 1 000 years ago, that the population was 30 times less and that very little industrial processes existed at the time..Industry uses huge amounts of water (for example several tons are necessary for each car being made)....
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,725
San Antonio, Tx
#55
This may be true.... but comsumption is vastly higher in all areas.... starting from the fact that almost no one had running water 1 000 years ago, that the population was 30 times less and that very little industrial processes existed at the time..Industry uses huge amounts of water (for example several tons are necessary for each car being made)....
This is true, Tomar, but it doesn’t actually reduce the total amount of water on the planet at all. All that water used to make cars, for example, is not “lost”. But it does reduce the amount of locally-available water in the area for a while.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
12,542
#56
This is true, Tomar, but it doesn’t actually reduce the total amount of water on the planet at all. All that water used to make cars, for example, is not “lost”. But it does reduce the amount of locally-available water in the area for a while.
oh we agree on that... but the thing is , with vastly higher consumption, "locally available water" may no longer be sufficient to cover needs (see what is happening in Cape Town as a vivid example)..... Sometimes water can be "imported" but in most cases it is not feasible (as in the case of Saudi - a country with no rivers- which you mentionned)
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,188
Brassicaland
#57
Japan is often cited as the prime example of a rapidly aging population and a shrinking economy.
How can such experiences be learned?
As I have said previously, the human population cannot expand indefinitely.
Open Data Platform
I guess these show which countries are more overpopulated than anything else.
 
#58
This is an interesting point. There is exactly the same amount of fresh water in the world today than there was a 1,000 years ago, perhaps longer.
By making dams, humans are holding back water from running quickly down to the sea. A good example is Lake Nasser, in Egypt/Sudan, which is about 165 cubic km of Nile water, held back by the Aswan dam, making the flow of water much more reliable than it was over 1000 years ago. The total amount of water in human control reservoirs, at some 3000 cubic kilometers, is a significant addition to the 91000 cu km already in freshwater lakes (there is only 2120 cu km in rivers).


Desalination is constantly growing, and producing some 100 million cubic meters (0.1 cu km) per day.
 
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#59
Japan is often cited as the prime example of a rapidly aging population and a shrinking economy.
How can such experiences be learned?
As I have said previously, the human population cannot expand indefinitely.
Open Data Platform
I guess these show which countries are more overpopulated than anything else.
Japan's economy isn't really shrinking, but growth is really slow. It's population is going down, but I regard that as good. It will take another 30 years for it to go below 100 million, in a place that is only about the same size as the UK. Certainly the fact that the population is ageing is causing problems, but I believe that those problems will largely be solved by new technologies.



I would like to see policies put in place to stop the huge growth of population in other places such as Africa, basically by giving education for all, including girls, giving employment and welfare to the poor, and making family planning accessible.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,188
Brassicaland
#60
Those who claim China isn't overpopulated aren't even ecologically conscious or concerned about the survival of the humankind.
Is it a "crime against humanity"?