Overpopulation and aging population?

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,146
San Antonio, Tx
#62
oh we agree on that... but the thing is , with vastly higher consumption, "locally available water" may no longer be sufficient to cover needs (see what is happening in Cape Town as a vivid example)..... Sometimes water can be "imported" but in most cases it is not feasible (as in the case of Saudi - a country with no rivers- which you mentionned)
I worked in Ryadh, Saudi Arabia for a few years and I learned that the city’s water supply comes from one or two aquifers. To my surprise, I also found out that these aquifers are not renewable, meaning that once the water is used up, that’s it. No wonder the Saudis looked at towing icebergs from ant-Arctica to the Persian Gulf. Didn’t work - they melted.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,308
Brassicaland
#63
I worked in Ryadh, Saudi Arabia for a few years and I learned that the city’s water supply comes from one or two aquifers. To my surprise, I also found out that these aquifers are not renewable, meaning that once the water is used up, that’s it. No wonder the Saudis looked at towing icebergs from ant-Arctica to the Persian Gulf. Didn’t work - they melted.
The water crisis for the Middle East is dire.
The title is about the future death boom in the developed world and a more depopulated developed world, even though Europe is already way overpopulated:
data.footprintnetwork.org/#/
I prefer using bio capacity as a standard for overpopulation.
How may the developed world go through the stage of depopulation?
Can the decline of birth rate be reversed?
 
Dec 2011
2,119
#64
The water crisis for the Middle East is dire.
The title is about the future death boom in the developed world and a more depopulated developed world, even though Europe is already way overpopulated:
data.footprintnetwork.org/#/
I prefer using bio capacity as a standard for overpopulation.
How may the developed world go through the stage of depopulation?
Can the decline of birth rate be reversed?
Yes the water crisis in the Middle East is dire. It is believed to be one of the major causes of the conflict in Syria, as millions of farmers left their lands, where the aquifers had run dry, and went to the cities.



For supply of drinking water, desalination plants - hopefully powered by solar energy - should be able to do this, though of course that requires huge investment, which places like Saudi Arabia should be able to afford. Israel has already been quite successfule in this regard.


Increased development should lead to reduction in birth rate.
 
Mar 2014
1,877
Lithuania
#65
Japan is often cited as the prime example of a rapidly aging population and a shrinking economy.
How can such experiences be learned?
As I have said previously, the human population cannot expand indefinitely.
Open Data Platform
I guess these show which countries are more overpopulated than anything else.
That map is interesting but it is wrong for sure. Lithuania there is shown as negative in bio capacity. In reality country is not densely populated and exporting massive amounts of grain and quite a bit of wood.
 
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#66
As far as Japan is concerned, their issue is NOT quite the underpopulation; rather, it is the declining quality of the population.
This problem is hardly limited to Japan. The "Me Generation" in the West gobbled up resources built over generations and did not really invest in future generations, who have therefore degenerated. Increasing the birth rate would entail help to these generations, which is taboo. But it would only be difficult in a political sense. The resources are there.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2011
2,119
#67
With the world's population heading toward 9 or 10 billion, I welcome the decline of the birth rate. It could well be said that it is happening in the wrong places, but really the decline is happening almost everywhere, it's just that, in Africa and Asia, the rates were so high in recent decades that even the marked decline seen in recent years is not enough to make the population fall. The decline in the birth rate in developed countries is leading to population reduction there. If I lived in Japan I would be glad that it is reduced, because I would say that the country is overpopulated.



The problem of a more aged population must be addressed by using more technology to care for the elderly.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,308
Brassicaland
#68
With the world's population heading toward 9 or 10 billion, I welcome the decline of the birth rate. It could well be said that it is happening in the wrong places, but really the decline is happening almost everywhere, it's just that, in Africa and Asia, the rates were so high in recent decades that even the marked decline seen in recent years is not enough to make the population fall. The decline in the birth rate in developed countries is leading to population reduction there. If I lived in Japan I would be glad that it is reduced, because I would say that the country is overpopulated.



The problem of a more aged population must be addressed by using more technology to care for the elderly.
Using technologies for negligible senescence can be a way to go; what should be the end?
Another way is to drastically reduce individual consumption of resources, which is also known as ecological footprint.
In a science fiction (or fantasy) short story called Micro-age (微纪元),humans are reduced to microscopic size and the impacts of even 100 billion humans would be minimal.
In the realistic setting, we cannot go this far; we can still drastically cut back our ecological footprint.
 
Dec 2011
2,119
#69
I don't know what you mean by "negiligible sensescence". For the foreseeable future, people are going to grow old, get weak sick, and die. I am saying that technology should provide the help that older people need.



The key change we need is to obtain sustainable energy, then we can have, for examples, big cars and houses, as long as they are made/heated/powered by energy from the Sun, water or wind.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,308
Brassicaland
#70
I don't know what you mean by "negiligible sensescence". For the foreseeable future, people are going to grow old, get weak sick, and die. I am saying that technology should provide the help that older people need.



The key change we need is to obtain sustainable energy, then we can have, for examples, big cars and houses, as long as they are made/heated/powered by energy from the Sun, water or wind.
The exact phrase is "engineered negligible senescence".
SRF Home | SENS Research Foundation
Since this is something that our civilization has never experienced, we cannot predict its results.