Pagan Societies were barbaric because Christian values were not around.

Sep 2015
1,521
England
Three cheers for Henry VIII !!!

1534 CE: King Henry VIII ("the father of the Royal Navy") established the centralised monotheistic Church of England by giving Rome the flick, appointing himself as the Supreme Head, and commissioning an English translation: the Great Bible (1535). Later versions include Bishops Bible (1568) and the KJV (1604).

Why should the Pope hold a monopoly on the Christian church industry of the 16th century?


King Henry VIII: Henry VIII of England - Wikipedia
Great Bible: Great Bible - Wikipedia
Cracking stuff. I agree.

Funnily enough i have had a gander through the KJB and it turns out the naturally human and disproportionate punishment of eternal pain in hell, was commuted down to a whipping for being a disbeliever, and if you truly, innocently missed the signs that would have led to your own faith, then only a very gentle whipping; thereafter boom, that's it, the rest of eternity, shades on.
 
Sep 2015
1,521
England
With regard to slavery and Christianity, this lecture is really good:

'One good thing from slavery is at least everyone, everywhere, knows slavery is wrong. 'That idea would have seemed almost incomprehensible to most of our pre-modern forebears'.

'Poverty was akin to slavery: an undesirable but inescapable fact of life. To abolish the category completely was inconceivable...the modern world has abolished slavery in Law, but we're very far from abolishing it in reality...this is a pervasive fact of human history...

The Christians response to the slavery of the Roman Empire typically took a non-confrontational approach etc citing the difference between physical slavery and mental slavery... etc

He continues: that via a purely economic motivation: 'christian slave-holding morphed into serfdom and after the plagues of the c.14th even serfdom eased or disappeared'. But Christians who were Portuguese, then began to enslave peoples they found on the west african coasts etc etc etc....

What a looney!

One intelligent thing to say, or one morally intelligent thing to say is, what a looney.

Just how typical is this - mind-bogglingly flighty, turgid, flagellate, monty-pythonesque life of brian one cross each, let me help you with that - buffoon of christian people ??!!!

Sorry but i have very little to say positive about the world, the human species, the moral intellect, instinct, or intuition, if that is amongst some of the best people we currently have.

Just 1.4 per cent of the British people attend church on a regular basis. If this person is not untypical of the Anglican academic/clergy then that's what they deserve, and not a lot more.

Hearing a mild nice little reading of some parable once a week is virtually the antithesis of this sort of ludicrous, embarrassing, nonsense.

Partial, biased, sectarian, doctrinaire, and potentially dogmatic.
________
  1. In 1347 the Statutes of Casimir the Great issued in Wislica emancipate all non-free people.
  2. In 1220 the Sachsenspoegel the most influential German code of law from the Middle Ages, condemns slavery as a violation of man's likeness to God.
  3. (a) In 1080 William the Conqueror prohibits the sale of any person to "heathens" (non-Christians) as slaves.
    3. (b) In 1102 the Council of London bans the slave trade.

    Timeline of abolition of slavery and serfdom - Wikipedia
 
Aug 2010
15,030
Welsh Marches
Gracious, what has he done to deserve that diatribe? He is talking as a historian and I find it hard to see that what you quote could be described in any way as 'looney' (although one should really judge by the tenor of the whole talk); he is Professor of the History of Christianity at one of our best universities, Durham, and has written some excellent historical works, so if he can count as a buffon and looney, I can only say: summon more of the kind.

For other touchy aspects of Christian history, I can also recommend these talks:


 
Sep 2015
1,521
England
Gracious, what has he done to deserve that diatribe? He is talking as a historian and I find it hard to see that what you quote could be described in any way as 'looney' (although one should really judge by the tenor of the whole talk); he is Professor of the History of Christianity at one of our best universities, Durham, and has written some excellent historical works, so if he can count as a buffon and looney, I can only say: summon more of the kind.

For other touchy aspects of Christian history, I can also recommend these talks:
The posts mentioned in post 526... are a start ...
It is not a diatribe. The diatribe as you call it has been covered in earlier posts.
What he is saying in the first 10 minutes is the real diatribe, which i quoted from...
simply a load of nonsense: thus 'flighty, turgid, flagellate...biased, sectarian, doctrinaire, and potentially dogmatic...
and surely we shouldn't judge, not by his credentials, but by what he actually says and writes ...