Pakistan elections

Nov 2014
1,542
Birmingham, UK
#11
also red scarf, bottom right, I'm in love :eek:


Zardari (aka Mr 10%)

:Dyeah, even a cursory knowledge of Pakistani politics will introduce one to the venality of Mr Zardari.
 

Shaheen

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,529
Sweden
#12
nice background, thanks.

considering he seems to have attempted to appeal on a cross-party basis, to almost attempt to transcend 'vote-banks' and so forth, would you say he has been successful? IE has he managed to woo Mohajir voters away from MQM, or pious Muslims from PML-N, or voters whose priority is social justice from AWP, and so on?
No problem. Khan has certainly been successful at attracting votes from a wide background of people, emphasising realities that they are all fed up with i.e. corruption, nepotism, income inequality,etc etc. At his core he is a populist, speaking about the "common mans" problems.

The good thing with his win has been the fact that he has gained enough votes to form a government on his own, needing only the support of some independent candidates to get a majority in parliament. Pre-election polls suggested he would win but would have to form a coalition government with the PPP (Zardari). In such a scenario no reforms would have been possible. Now with a strong mandate he can push for actual reforms.

also red scarf, bottom right, I'm in love
Cant blame you haha

yeah, even a cursory knowledge of Pakistani politics will introduce one to the venality of Mr Zardari.
A common theory amongst the masses in Pakistan is that he had his wife Benazir Bhutto assassinated, in order to get sympathy votes in the then upcoming 2008 elections. This just shows the view people have of him.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,647
USA
#13
Pakistani people at the voting booths:





This election will mark the second time that one civilian government has handed power to another after serving a full term - a historic landmark. The problems facing Pakistan are very deep and pervasive, and many had long been a part of its cultivated Islamic culture. Democracy in Pakistan has always been a fa├žade. Imran Khan is basically a product of this culture. Hoping for one man, even if he is ideal, to solve them is fantasy.

Here are some of the problems facing Pakistan, which is considered a failed country:
- Islamic extremism
- Endemic corruption
- Government supported Muslim terrorism
- Hostile neighbors (India and Afghanistan)
- Broken economy with currency in free fall
- Army holds the real power in the country
- Can't accept the reality in Kashmir
- Rule of law
 
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kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,647
USA
#14
nice background, thanks.

considering he seems to have attempted to appeal on a cross-party basis, to almost attempt to transcend 'vote-banks' and so forth, would you say he has been successful? IE has he managed to woo Mohajir voters away from MQM, or pious Muslims from PML-N, or voters whose priority is social justice from AWP, and so on?

He also possesses an almost rock star status amongst the youth (he was a notorious playboy in his young days when he captained the Pakistan cricket team to become World Cup champions in 1992). Since entering politics he has tried to change his image but he is still remarkably fit compared to his peers with big bellies and double cheeks. This endears him to the youth

:) yeah, he always was a good-looking, charming dude.
When Imran khan knew that he was going to win, after preliminary results, he addressed the nation on TV, and promised that he would create a just welfare state along the lines of what the Prophet Mohammed did centuries ago. Does he know that Mohammed created his Muslim welfare society (Ummah) using the wealth and property looted from his opponents who lost wars with him?

Imran is onto his third marriage, as he has been cultivating his image as a pious Muslim, often wearing a traditional tunic and pajamas, fingering prayer beads and huddling with religious party leaders. In February, as the campaign was getting underway, he married a woman named Bushra Maneka, whom he described as his "spiritual adviser," then published photos of their nuptial ceremony with her face and body fully hidden beneath scarves. Picture shown below:



One Reham Khan, another woman Khan had married briefly in 2015 and divorced, was reported to be writing a tell-all book about his scandalous personal behavior. She told the Times newspaper that the book was not ready to be published but that issues such as "sexual harassment, sexual perversion, sexual favors" are "in the public interest" when they are "connected to someone's ability to govern."

His first marriage was to one Jemima Goldsmith, a beautiful British socialite. (Divorced with two children, the two are still close, and she tweeted him congratulations on his election win.)
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,429
India
#15
Improving relations with India is nothing more than a pipedream since the Pakistan Army(supreme authority of Pakistan) don't want any improved relations with India.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,851
SoCal
#16
His first marriage was to one Jemima Goldsmith, a beautiful British socialite. (Divorced with two children, the two are still close, and she tweeted him congratulations on his election win.)
Did she convert to Islam when she married him?

Also, to clarify--Imran Khan is a Pashtun, correct?

BTW, he looks pretty handsome for a 66-year-old man.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,647
USA
#17
Did she convert to Islam when she married him?

Also, to clarify--Imran Khan is a Pashtun, correct?

BTW, he looks pretty handsome for a 66-year-old man.
She converted to Islam, as it always happens when a non-Muslim woman marries a Muslim. She was Jewish.

Imran is a Pashtun, though he shows some Indic mix.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
17,851
SoCal
#20
She converted to Islam, as it always happens when a non-Muslim woman marries a Muslim. She was Jewish.

Imran is a Pashtun, though he shows some Indic mix.
Imran looks a bit Jewish or Arab. He reminds me of Jamin Raskin or Muammar Gaddafi.

Also, Jemima remained a Muslim after her divorce from Imran, correct? After all, many Muslims unfortunately believe that apostasy should be punishable by death! :(