Patton’s generalship?

Nov 2019
11
The Arctic
There was sufficient aircraft for the operation because the original plan was scheduled for two drops per day. This was Monty's plan and was changed to only one drop per day by the commander of the First Allied Airbourne Army Lewis Brereton. Combined operations were still in their infancy so Brereton answered directly to SHAEF. No commander other than Ike could overrule him. On Gavin I have never in all the books I have read on Market Garden been lead to believe he had insufficient forces for his job. To be accusing Monty of insubordination is kind of ironic. The first person I can think of when hearing this word is Gavin. He didn't just fail to achieve his objectives on the day. He failed to follow orders and actually send any troops to the bridge. It's double irony because the British were finally early for a change so trying to blame them and the 1000's of illusory tanks that he had sole exclusive knowledge of sounds like excuses.
 
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Lord Fairfax

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
3,448
Changing trains at Terrapin Station...
I am always amused a the selective reasoning used here, but this example beginning with the Market Garden question certainly takes the prize.
Your facts & analysis are significantly in error.
However as Market Garden is completely off topic for a discussion on Patton's generalship, im going to respond to your post on a new thread on Monty & M-G here:


There was sufficient aircraft for the operation because the original plan was scheduled for two drops per day. This was Monty's plan and was changed to only one drop per day by the commander of the First Allied Airbourne Army Lewis Brereton. Combined operations were still in their infancy so Brereton answered directly to SHAEF. No commander other than Ike could overrule him. On Gavin I have never in all the books I have read on Market Garden been lead to believe he had insufficient forces for his job. To be accusing Monty of insubordination is kind of ironic. The first person I can think of when hearing this word is Gavin. He didn't just fail to achieve his objectives on the day. He failed to follow orders and actually send any troops to the bridge. It's double irony because the British were finally early for a change so trying to blame them and the 1000's of illusory tanks that he had sole exclusive knowledge of sounds like excuses.
Excellent post. :cool:
I shall respond on the other thread.