People with extremely funny names

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,890
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Which has been talked about in post # 110 on Page 11 and post # 127 on page 13.

There is a honest to goodness place in Norway, the official name of which is "Hell".

Some ways back a Norwegian government minister even had a summer house there, and internationally there was some initial consternation during vacation times, as the official answer to calls to said minister would be answered with: "No, I'm sorry, the minister has gone to Hell."

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(A "hell" in Swedish or Norwegian is kind of a flat rock or carved slab of stone.)
Hell is also a family name.

Hell is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Astronomer Maximilian Hell (1720-1792) was also a Jesuit. There is a crater on the Moon named for him.
 
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Likes: Futurist
Nov 2016
968
Germany
I wonder how the Germans would have felt being up against General Gott.
The Nazis would probably have commented cynically on that. As is well known, the philosopher Nietzsche was very popular with them, and his most famous saying is: "Gott ist tot" (God is dead).

The English themselves made a German pun by calling the general "Strafer":

William Gott - Wikipedia

His nickname "Strafer" was a pun on the German war slogan Gott strafe England (God punish England).

However, a noun ´Strafer´ does not exist since the verb ´bestrafen´ or ´strafen´ (to punish) does not have a noun in German, unlike English, where ´punisher´ is the noun of ´punish´.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,890
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
May Gott prevent this woman from becoming Germany's next chancellor, at least because of her strange name:

I have heard that in German it s common to build up long compound names and words out of shorter words. Thus if it is a problem to decide how to pronounce it, break down each word into its components.

For example, I read James Blish's science fiction novel Earthman Come Home as a child. A certain chemical was mentioned by its popular name, and also by the chemical name "polybathroomflourine" which looked very long and complex so I didn't bother trying to imagine how it was pronounced. And years later I realized that "polybathroomflourine" could be broken down into parts and pronounced "poly bath room floor ine" - and then I got the joke of another scene where the complex pattern of floor tiles in a bathroom resemble the chemical structure of the chemical.

I considered the name of actor Gustl Gstettenbaur (1914-1996) to hard to pronounce, especially in the form of Gustl Stark-Gstettenbaur, until I imagined singing it to the tune of "Deutschland uber alles".

So I think that I could learn to slowly pronounce Annegret Kramp-Karrenbaur reasonably accurately, though much slower than many Germans could. But AKK would be a lot easier.
 
Sep 2012
3,882
Bulgaria
Ok. I found the etymology of Schweinsteiger thanks to a german guy. Der Steiger is indeed a foreman in coal mines, but this is dead end, it leads nowhere. Steiger is derived from the middle high german Stige, meaning stable so Schweinsteiger means a guy who sleeps in the pigsty.

Arnord Schwarzenegger, Schwarz-en-egg-er. Schwarz meaning black + en, the inflected form; egg (=ecke) archaic meaning peak/mountain ergo the guy of the black mountain/ has nothing to do with English N-word.

Norman Schwarzkopf Jr. - this is easy, Schwarz-kopf. Schwartz meaning black and Kopf meaning head, old German noble family name.
 

Offspring

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
8,092
România
When it comes to being paid to sit on a bench, this guy is a pure legend: Bogdan Lobonț - Wikipedia
On 31 August 2009, Italian Serie A team A.S. Roma signed Lobonț in a co-ownership deal from Dinamo, with an option for the club to buy him outright at the end of the season, for a fee of €1.5 million.[11] He made his first appearance for the Giallorossi on 4 October, coming off the bench after 23 minutes in a game against Napoli.[12] On 4 March 2012, he came on against Lazio because of Stekelenburg's red card. Because of starter Maarten Stekelenburg's injury, he was the temporary first goalkeeper in seven matches in the 2011–12 season.[13]

On 1 July 2013, Lobonț signed a new three-year contract with Roma which would keep him at the club until 2016.[14] Even though he had not featured in an AS Roma match for about four years, in 2016 he extended his contract with the team yet again, making AS Roma the last team of his playing career.[15]
22 appearances in 9 years.

The actual reason why they kept him for so long is that he was a really fun guy and a locker room leader. He was good at keeping the morale up.
I'm not really sure what Schweinsteiger means, I heard various interpretations (person who sleeps in the pigsty, person who mounts pigs / pig-climber, a pig overseer, etc.) and I interacted with Germans who find it funny.
In Germany the name is regarded as ugly, it means, as you already indicate, ´someone who climbs on a pig´.
Ok. I found the etymology of Schweinsteiger thanks to a german guy. Der Steiger is indeed a foreman in coal mines, but this is dead end, it leads nowhere. Steiger is derived from the middle high german Stige, meaning stable so Schweinsteiger means a guy who sleeps in the pigsty.
As I was saying, different interpretations are always presented.
 
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May 2012
164
Sacramento CA USA
This is about a couple's name, not an individual's name...

I once met a woman whose surname was Cox. She was engaged to a fellow whose surname was Hyman.

It seemed like destiny, with an ironic gender flip.