People with extremely funny names

Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#21
That athenian noble family, the Alcmaeonidae had a tradition of naming their sons "Megakles". The first archon of Athens was also reputedly called "Megakles". It literally means "Big man". I love the whole stone age feel of it, and how it constrasts with the usually terribly cultured aura the ancient Greeks are often portayed as having. It cracked me up the first time I heard it.

It's an analogous thing with many old Roman names really. Once you start thinking about what the names actually mean, guys like "Brutus" (the dullard) or "Tacitus" (the silent) start sounding more like they're Brooklyn mobsters than these terribly dignified statesmen, philosophers and generals they are often portrayed as. I like it - I think it makes them come alive, and can also be quite funny at times.

One roman naming convention I really find hilarious in its stoicism is how they started naming people "Quintus", "Sixtus" etc. because they ran out of names. Imagine the childhood trauma of being called "Fifth"...
 
Nov 2015
1,752
Kyiv
#23
The most amusing names appeared among Russians in the 1920s – 1930s.
For example:

- New female name Ninel as Lenin, read backwards

- two twin brothers were registered in the 1920s - Серп and Молот (Hammer and Sickle) - in honor of the Emblem of the Land of the Soviets

- the female name of Оюшминальда (Oyushminalda) - short for Отто Юльевич Шмидт на Льдине - Otto Yulievich Schmidt on Ice floe - in honor of the Russian polar traveler

- male name Vilorik - an abbreviation of the phrase Владимир Ильич Ленин Освободил Рабочих и Крестьян - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin Liberated Workers and Peasants

etc.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,716
SoCal
#24
The most amusing names appeared among Russians in the 1920s – 1930s.
For example:

- New female name Ninel as Lenin, read backwards
Haha!

- two twin brothers were registered in the 1920s - Серп and Молот (Hammer and Sickle) - in honor of the Emblem of the Land of the Soviets
This sort of reminds me of Armand Hammer. His parents named him after the Arm and Hammer.

- the female name of Оюшминальда (Oyushminalda) - short for Отто Юльевич Шмидт на Льдине - Otto Yulievich Schmidt on Ice floe - in honor of the Russian polar traveler
Pretty creative. :)

- male name Vilorik - an abbreviation of the phrase Владимир Ильич Ленин Освободил Рабочих и Крестьян - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin Liberated Workers and Peasants
Haha!

Also, there's the male name Vilen--short for Vladimir Ilych Lenin.

What other funny names are there?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,716
SoCal
#25
That athenian noble family, the Alcmaeonidae had a tradition of naming their sons "Megakles". The first archon of Athens was also reputedly called "Megakles". It literally means "Big man". I love the whole stone age feel of it, and how it constrasts with the usually terribly cultured aura the ancient Greeks are often portayed as having. It cracked me up the first time I heard it.

It's an analogous thing with many old Roman names really. Once you start thinking about what the names actually mean, guys like "Brutus" (the dullard) or "Tacitus" (the silent) start sounding more like they're Brooklyn mobsters than these terribly dignified statesmen, philosophers and generals they are often portrayed as. I like it - I think it makes them come alive, and can also be quite funny at times.

One roman naming convention I really find hilarious in its stoicism is how they started naming people "Quintus", "Sixtus" etc. because they ran out of names. Imagine the childhood trauma of being called "Fifth"...
Thanks for reminding me about this guy :):

Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar II - Wikipedia

He wasn't actually a Roman; rather, he was a good old-fashioned Mississippi gentleman. :)
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,716
SoCal
#26
I had a lecturer in university Mr Vowels.

named his first child 'A', 2nd 'E', rumor is he wanted 5 children but he was divorced after 2. University urban myth,
Did he seriously give his two kids a one-letter name?

Haha! :D
 

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