People with extremely funny names

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,890
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#51
My ancestor, Jacob Demuth (1779-1842) of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, married three times and had 20 children, and gave really complicated names to two of his sons.

One of his sons was baptized as Carl Augustus Rodolphus Hartafel Demuth.

Another son was baptized as Gottfried Ottfried Obadja Eckert Demuth.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,890
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#53
Thomas Elisha Hogg (1842-1880) wrote an epic Civil War poem called The Fate of Marvin , and a girl named Ima was a character. His brother, James Stephen "Big Jim" Hogg, named his daughter born in 1882 after the character. Yes, he named his daughter Ima Hogg (1882-1975), known as the First Lady of Texas.

Unsurprisingly, Ima Hogg preferred to sign with her initial I. What is surprising is she never changed her first name, nor ever married someone with a different surname. I like to joke that the reason Ima never married was because her suitors all had surnames like Butcher, Nutt, Crook, Hooker, etc.

The story that Ima had a sister Ura Hogg is just an urban legend.

I read a book about stupidity written sometime before 1968 as I remember. It mentioned some children's names from Nazi Germany, such as Bomben-und-Grenaden-Hilde and Hitlerchen.
 
Likes: Futurist

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
#54
Ivar Horse-Cock.

He was mentioned in one of the Norse Sagas. He isn't the only person mentioned in a saga with a hilarious nickname either. I forget the exact name in English now, but there was a female whose nickname translates to something like "prow-tits."

Anyone called Randy.
There was an American baseball player named Randy Johnson. I have no idea whether he ever traveled to the U.K., but if he did I would imagine that must have made for some awkward introductions.

For those browsing the forum who may not speak English as their first language, randy is British/Commonwealth slang for being sexually aroused, and Johnson is sometimes used as slang for a penis.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,042
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#55
An unfortunate Indian name is the surname Dikshit. It's pronounced Diks-hit, so more like Dixit, but that didn't stop a couple of New Zealand comedians from mocking an Indian minister by this name, for which they lost their jobs.
 
Likes: Futurist

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,845
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#56
Back to historical figures ... what about President "Harding"? Or "Fillmore"? Also Franklin Pierce didn't joke ... [I'm taking a look at the list of the US President and I'm avoiding to name a couple of recent Presidents with a surname reminding a vegetable and one of them had a baker in his administration ...].
 
Likes: Futurist

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,305
Netherlands
#58
We have a parliamentarian by the name of Tiny Cox. Personally the best name I have encountered is a football layer called Dik Te Vrede. "Dik tevreden" is untranslatable and means something along the lines of "good job" or "to satisfaction."
 
Apr 2014
204
Liverpool, England
#59
How about the English Puritan preacher of the seventeenth century: Praise-God Barebone - reputedly christened Had-Christ-not-died-thou-hadst-been-damned Barebone?

Actually, some Puritan girls' names have lasted better - all the feminine virtues: Grace, Felicity, Prudence, Constance - Silence never caught on though.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2009
9,944
#60
How about the English Puritan preacher of the seventeenth century: Praise-God Barebone - reputedly christened Had-Christ-not-died-thou-hadst-been-damned Barebone?

Actually, some Puritan girls' names have lasted better - all the feminine virtues: Grace, Felicity, Prudence, Constance - Silence never caught on though.
And who said Puritans had no sense of humor?
 
Likes: Futurist