Phallicism: sizes and esthetics

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Closed
Nov 2016
1,023
Germany
Some remarks on the origin of the phallus cult:

Numerous Late Paleoltihic caves, some 20,000 years old, have within vulva depictions and V-like signs. In El Castillo four intensely red painted vulvas are placed beside a black arrow sign. In Bedeilhac a vulva is most lifelike sculptured in the clay soil, showing the clitoris. The entrance of the cave of La Magdeleine in France presents two reliefs to each side, showing women with emphasized three-sided pudendas. To take such depictions as mere sexual symbols instead of symbols of regeneration would be an anachronistic misreading, just for the reason that if a sexual meaning was intended it would be unexplainable why there was no parallel depiction of male genitalia.

The absence of any ritual representation of a phallus or of the sexual (in the form of a coitus) up to the Neolithic is an almost compelling indication for the ignorance of fatherhood, because the significance for procreation was a prerequisite for the ritual representation of genitals. No representation of the phallus or the sexual therefore automatically means ignorance of the male contribution to procreation.

The oldest known representations of a human sexual act date back to the late 9th millennium BCE, the early phase of the Neolithic: a stone relief and a stone sculpture from the Natufian culture in Ain Sakhri in Jordan. The stone sculpture of an ithyphallic fertility god found in Göbekli Tepe can be dated at about the same time.

According to Catal Hüyük excavator James Mellaart, further finds of a cultic phallus date back to the 6th millennium (5,800 BCE in Tepe Güran, 5,800 BCE in Sarab, 5,500 BCE in Tell-es Sawwan and 5,000 BCE in the Halaf culture).

So the phallus established itself as a sacral symbol only in the Neolithic. This is all the more astonishing because its counterpart, the sacredly exaggerated vagina, has shaped religious iconography for tens of thousands of years.

Since its fertility aspect justified this practice, the absence of the symbolic phallus can only mean that fatherhood was unknown in the Paleolithic.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,991
Sydney
the absence of the symbolic phallus can only mean that fatherhood was unknown in the Paleolithic.
I found this statement deeply unbelievable ,
recent paleolithic societies like the Plain Indians or the Australian aborigines were fully aware of fatherhood
 

Todd Feinman

Ad Honorem
Oct 2013
6,514
Planet Nine, Oregon
I found this statement deeply unbelievable ,
recent paleolithic societies like the Plain Indians or the Australian aborigines were fully aware of fatherhood
Is it meant to imply some female dominated orgiastic behavior where the individual fathers are not known and children are raised in a collective?!
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,235
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Were people in olden times as obsessed with oversized phallus as people in modern times are? Was micropenis shaming as bad as it is now?
If equally well-endowed when erect, who would be considered more ideal back then: the shower or the grower?
This is going to be your one, and only warning. If you post any more inappropriate content like this, you will be suspended for an extended peroid of time. I've had more than enough of the nonsense you constantly post.

THREAD CLOSED.
 
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