Philip and Alexander - ancient Greek corruptions of original, native, ancient Macedonian royal names

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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,040
Portugal
Only (the northern) barbarians were depicted as being blond, prove me otherwise.
Are you serious? I counselled you to read the Iliad, it was for that motif! As @DiocletianIsBetterThanYou already noted.

Anyway, some quick copy/paste:

We can quote the play “Hippolytus” by Euripides, when the main character addresses to Aphrodite, that was often depicted as blonde: “But, dear lady, take this coronal for your golden hair from a worshipful hand. For I alone of mortals have this privilegie…” (lines 80-85);

By the way, people that weren’t Barbarians from the North were also blond, in the play “Medea”, by the same author, a messenger speaks addressing to Medea (niece of Circe and granddaughter of Helios): “And someone kissed the hands and another the blond heads of the children.” (lines 1140-1145)

In the play “Iphigenia in Tauris”, by Euripides (lines 50-55): “One support of my father's house was left, I thought, and it had yellow locks of hair waving from its capital, and took on human voice.”

The chorus sings in the play “Heracles”, also by Euripides: “First he cleared the grove of Zeus of a lion, and put its skin upon his back, hiding his yellow hair in its fearful tawny gaping jaws.” (lines 360-361).

“Birds” by Aristophanes: “Your pure notes rise through the thick leaves of the yew-tree right up to the throne of Zeus, where Phoebus listens to you, Phoebus with his golden hair.” (lines 215-220).

As for the Romans, you can read Suetonius about “Divus Augustus”: “His teeth were thin set, small and scaly, his hair a little curled, and inclining to a yellow colour.” (Chapter 77).

...

I could go on, these quotes were picked quickly.

In other words, pardon me to say, what you said is a complete nonsense! Don’t go that way, it is embarrassing for you. But you didn’t clarify what I asked. Probably it doesn’t matter if is a reasoning that departs from this huge nonsense.
 
Aug 2019
336
North
Are you serious? I counselled you to read the Iliad, it was for that motif! As @DiocletianIsBetterThanYou already noted.

Anyway, some quick copy/paste:

We can quote the play “Hippolytus” by Euripides, when the main character addresses to Aphrodite, that was often depicted as blonde: “But, dear lady, take this coronal for your golden hair from a worshipful hand. For I alone of mortals have this privilegie…” (lines 80-85);

By the way, people that weren’t Barbarians from the North were also blond, in the play “Medea”, by the same author, a messenger speaks addressing to Medea (niece of Circe and granddaughter of Helios): “And someone kissed the hands and another the blond heads of the children.” (lines 1140-1145)

In the play “Iphigenia in Tauris”, by Euripides (lines 50-55): “One support of my father's house was left, I thought, and it had yellow locks of hair waving from its capital, and took on human voice.”

The chorus sings in the play “Heracles”, also by Euripides: “First he cleared the grove of Zeus of a lion, and put its skin upon his back, hiding his yellow hair in its fearful tawny gaping jaws.” (lines 360-361).

“Birds” by Aristophanes: “Your pure notes rise through the thick leaves of the yew-tree right up to the throne of Zeus, where Phoebus listens to you, Phoebus with his golden hair.” (lines 215-220).

As for the Romans, you can read Suetonius about “Divus Augustus”: “His teeth were thin set, small and scaly, his hair a little curled, and inclining to a yellow colour.” (Chapter 77).

...

I could go on, these quotes were picked quickly.

In other words, pardon me to say, what you said is a complete nonsense! Don’t go that way, it is embarrassing for you. But you didn’t clarify what I asked. Probably it doesn’t matter if is a reasoning that departs from this huge nonsense.
All of the ancient greek blond-haired are not real life persons, but a product of a yearning for the golden divine. That simple.

To speak about the ancient romans is a different thing. They were clearly admixing with the celts since time immemorial.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2018
1,734
Sydney
So you no longer think that Romans weren't ever portrayed as blond. I suppose that's an improvement. As for Greeks, here's a non-divine example: Dionysius of Syracuse - The Classical Art of Command

And if you're going to interpret the blondness of Greek heroes and gods in relation to their divinity, one could make the same case for Alexander, who was indeed presented as a man with divine links.

You also still haven't explained why you think any of this is significant. I think you should just come out and say what you really want to say about Alexander and the Ancient Macedonians.
 
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Aug 2019
336
North
So you no longer think that Romans weren't ever portrayed as blond. I suppose that's an improvement. As for Greeks, here's a non-divine example: Dionysius of Syracuse - The Classical Art of Command

And if you're going to interpret the blondness of Greek heroes and gods in relation to their divinity, one could make the same case for Alexander, who was indeed presented as a man with divine links.

You also still haven't explained why you think any of this is significant. I think you should just come out and say what you really want to say about Alexander and the Ancient Macedonians.
Romans are not important here.

Would you please point to me the part of the text which is important for the discussion?

One can't make such a case for alexander, as he was an actual person.

My stance should be quite clear by now. Like so many scholars, I too don't consider ancient macedonians ancient greeks. And, I'm passionate about it.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2018
1,734
Sydney
Romans are not important here.

Would you please point to me the part of the text which is important for the discussion?

One can't make such a case for alexander, as he was an actual person.

My stance should be quite clear by now. Like so many scholars, I too don't consider ancient macedonians ancient greeks. And, history's my passion.
No, look at the link yourself. And one can easily make that case for Alexander, as I just did. If he is presented as divine/quasi-divine, and he presented himself as such, then his blond hair can be interpreted as such. So make a proper case for the Macedonians not being Greeks.
 
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Reactions: Openminded
Aug 2019
336
North
No, look at the link yourself. And one can easily make that case for Alexander, as I just did. If he is presented as divine/quasi-divine, and he presented himself as such, then his blond hair can be interpreted as such. So make a proper case for the Macedonians not being Greeks.
I remark by way of a smartphone. I can't enlarge the text. But I've still enlarged it a bit, and saw the word "zeus". An important word for the context? I certainly think so.

Would alexander's men rebbel against a divine person?
 
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