Philippine–American War

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,630
San Antonio, Tx
Haven't Japan and China converted to Christianity on their own? Am I missing something?
There were/are a few Japanese Christians, but the vast majority is not Christian. In the Philippines, many, if not most, of the natives were already Catholic - the Spanish took care of that, but there is/was a significant Moslem population there. Most Chinese are not Christian.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,324
I was making a joke about McKinley's statement about Christianizing the Philippines. According to the figures I found it is 86% Catholic, 6% local Christian denominations / cults, 2% Protestant, 4% Muslim, and 2% indigenous pagan. There may be some who are nominally Catholic, but practice traditional religions. The Spanish were really good at Christianization, and it may be the only predominantly Christian country in Asia.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,872
Portugal
The Philippine’s cinema has been dedicated recently to the period and theme. “General Luna” was one of the biggest productions: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4944352/

Trailer:



A sequel will come out soon “Goyo”.

Goyo’s trailer:



They have certainly interesting (although fictionalized as in all movies) perspectives, most especially for the eyes of the US Americans.
 
Nov 2016
116
Niceville
There you have your answer. We needed to Christianize the Philippines.
Understood. But are not the Spanish, who were there before us, Christian? Were there any Spanish missions in the Philippines?

This isn't what I was thinking of, but I did find

Wood–Forbes Mission, (1921), fact-finding commission sent to the Philippines by newly elected U.S. president Warren Harding in March 1921, which concluded that Filipinos were not yet ready for independence from the United States.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,872
Portugal
Understood. But are not the Spanish, who were there before us, Christian? Were there any Spanish missions in the Philippines?

This isn't what I was thinking of, but I did find

Wood–Forbes Mission, (1921), fact-finding commission sent to the Philippines by newly elected U.S. president Warren Harding in March 1921, which concluded that Filipinos were not yet ready for independence from the United States.
The Spanish were at the period and still are in their majority Catholics. In the period of the European expansion the Spanish, like the Portuguese tried to spread their catholic faith, and from that religious perspective the evangelisation of the Philippines was a major success. It was a Spanish colony since the 16th century and it is probably the only country in Asia where the majority of the Population is Christian. So the idea to Christianize the Philippines by the USA, if propagated at the time, it was just an excuse for the public opinion.

As for the conclusions that you state from the Wood–Forbes Mission they are certainly concordant with the colonial spirit still strong in the 1920’s.
 
Feb 2018
227
Manila
The Spanish were at the period and still are in their majority Catholics. In the period of the European expansion the Spanish, like the Portuguese tried to spread their catholic faith, and from that religious perspective the evangelisation of the Philippines was a major success. It was a Spanish colony since the 16th century and it is probably the only country in Asia where the majority of the Population is Christian. So the idea to Christianize the Philippines by the USA, if propagated at the time, it was just an excuse for the public opinion.

As for the conclusions that you state from the Wood–Forbes Mission they are certainly concordant with the colonial spirit still strong in the 1920’s.
Americans will christianize the Filipinos by Protestant faith.

During American occupation of the Philippines, a lot of Protestant groups came in to spread their beliefs to the natives.