Philippine–American War

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,617
Portugal
#21
Americans will christianize the Filipinos by Protestant faith.

During American occupation of the Philippines, a lot of Protestant groups came in to spread their beliefs to the natives.
To state that “Christian” in the context is necessarily “protestant” is possible but it is also a conclusion that needs further support.

Furthermore the USA didn’t had an official religion, and those private groups you mention were not governmental, didn’t need a USA colony or governmental permission to establish abroad and many were sent to other regions that were not USA colonies, for instance in the 20th century were sent to Portuguese colonies in Africa, such as Angola.

So, in other words, it doesn’t seem to exist a direct relation between the religious factor in the article you mention (can you post a link?) and the main reason for the maintenance of the Philippines as a colony. It doesn’t seem that the USA international governmental policy in the late 19th century had the same religious zeal that the Spanish in the 16th when they established in the Philippines.
 
Feb 2018
224
Manila
#23
To state that “Christian” in the context is necessarily “protestant” is possible but it is also a conclusion that needs further support.

Furthermore the USA didn’t had an official religion, and those private groups you mention were not governmental, didn’t need a USA colony or governmental permission to establish abroad and many were sent to other regions that were not USA colonies, for instance in the 20th century were sent to Portuguese colonies in Africa, such as Angola.

So, in other words, it doesn’t seem to exist a direct relation between the religious factor in the article you mention (can you post a link?) and the main reason for the maintenance of the Philippines as a colony. It doesn’t seem that the USA international governmental policy in the late 19th century had the same religious zeal that the Spanish in the 16th when they established in the Philippines.

The difference between American and Spanish propagation of their faiths is Americans never forced the Filipinos to embrace Protestantism but the Spaniards forced the natives to be Catholics and abandon its animist faith.


but propagation of Protestant faith is not the main priority of US colonizers in the Philippines at all.
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,804
San Antonio, Tx
#24
Some people believe that the Spanish-American War of 1898 was simply an imperialist acquisition of territory (by force) gained as a result of attacking a declining colonial power (Spain) by the USA.

We seem to have forgotten just how controversial this naked aggression was in the Congress of the United States. There were a goodly number of members of both the House and Senate who believed that this was a gross violation of long-standing American policy. William Randolph Hearst played a large part in stirring up war clouds probably more to increase the circulation of his rag newspapers than anything having to do with thoughtful international policies of the US. There was as well, a faction in the US government that lusted after overseas territories in a last-gasp of imperialism where most places had already been seized by other powers: the British; the Dutch, Belgians, Germans and French.

I find it quite interesting that the US in general had very little appetite for these foreign territories and quite early on decided that the Philippines should be independent sooner athyer than later. I don’t believe that there was any religious reason whatsoever behind the acquisition of the Philippines - it was just greed, or the reaching for the last few doughnuts left on the plate. We would have quit the Philippines earlier, but unfortunately, WW2 and the Japanese intervened.

In the end, we kept Guam, American Samoa and Puerto Rico (we bought the Virgin Islands from Denmark), but the biggest “possession”, the Philippines, was let go shortly after the war.
 
Jan 2019
1
Syracuse, NY
#25
Well the United States was already interested in acquiring the Philippines prior to the Spanish-American War due to its location in the orient making it a "Stepping stone" to China and India. In addition the Philippines were already fighting for their independence from Spain before the war, first under the leadership of Andres Bonifacio, before he was betrayed by rival revolutionary Emilio Aguinaldo. During the Spanish-American War the Philippines thought that if they sided with America they would get their independence. When Spain was defeated, Aguinaldo proclaimed himself king of the Philippines. This did not go over well with the Americans, who needed the islands to get them better economic access to India. The Americans ended up buying the Philippines from Spain and invading the islands in 1899, toppling the monarchist regime and killing over 200,000 civilians.

King Aguinaldo was captured and exiled in 1901 and the last Filipino generals surrendered the following year, however the US continued to fight the Moslem Moro people on the Island of Mindanao until 1914. For the next three decades the United States used the Philippines as a strategic military outpost, and preventing unrest in the islands by promising the Filipinos eventual independence, which was initially a lie as the Americans had no intention of leaving. The US was so ignorant of the Philippines that after WW2 broke out in the Pacific, Japanese invaders were welcomed by Filipinos who thought they had come to free them, this of course was not the case, and a guerilla resistance against the Japanese broke out. After the war was over the Philippines were bombed to a pulp, and the US didn't want to pay for the damages, so they granted the Philippines independence as a money-saving move.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#26
Umm, do you mean The Spanish American War of 1898?

Why bother? Two main reasons;

A permanent strategic presence, and SUGAR, one of the earliest international commodities.

The Philippines were important to the US for 100 years.

The US influenced Filipino life at all levels, and was unfazed by the dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Politically, in the beginning, the then governor, General Wiliam Howard Taft personally chose the Filipino national l hero, Jose Rizal, from several candidates. Rizal was perfect; a doctor and polymath intellectual who had been executed by the Spanish for sedition in 1896. He wrote a lot, among them the books. 'El Filerbustismo' and ' Nole MI Tangere' (Touch Me Not) a Victorian Melodrama. Rizal wrote that a people can be free without political independence. The US thought that was just dandy. So Rizal became the Filipino National hero, a position he still holds.


Yes, I read the two tedious books for a paper I did at University. I got the idea after visiting the Philippines in 1979. I was a amused at the time that TV presenters all spoke with a broad American accent. Far less amused by the staggeringly obvious social inequality and gut wrenching poverty. EG I saw the slum 'Tondo' in Manila, and the poverty of sugar workers on the Island of Negros.

When I was there, the country was officially Catholic ,and had been since the Spanish,. There were still some elderly upper class filipinos who spoke Spanish. The official language of the Philippines at that time was Tagalog, one of the many dialects spoken throughout the 2000 inhabited islands of the country. Most people I met also spoke English.

--------------------------------------------------------

Jose Rizal was a fascinating figure, well worth reading about. His writings? Not so much.

Some[who?] suggest that Jose Rizal was made a legislated national hero by the American forces occupying Philippines. In 1901, the American Governor General William Howard Taft suggested that the U.S. sponsored Philippine Commission name Rizal a national hero for Filipinos. Jose Rizal was an ideal candidate, favourable to the American occupiers since he was dead, and non-violent, a favourable quality which, if emulated by Filipinos, would not threaten the American rule or change the status quo of the occupiers of Philippine islands. Rizal did not advocate independence for Philippines either.[81] Subsequently, the US-sponsored commission passed Act No. 346 which set the anniversary of Rizal’s death as a “day of observance.”[82]

José Rizal - Wikipedia
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,617
Portugal
#27
Well the United States was already interested in acquiring the Philippines prior to the Spanish-American War due to its location in the orient making it a "Stepping stone" to China and India. In addition the Philippines were already fighting for their independence from Spain before the war, first under the leadership of Andres Bonifacio, before he was betrayed by rival revolutionary Emilio Aguinaldo. During the Spanish-American War the Philippines thought that if they sided with America they would get their independence. When Spain was defeated, Aguinaldo proclaimed himself king of the Philippines. This did not go over well with the Americans, who needed the islands to get them better economic access to India. The Americans ended up buying the Philippines from Spain and invading the islands in 1899, toppling the monarchist regime and killing over 200,000 civilians.

King Aguinaldo was captured and exiled in 1901 and the last Filipino generals surrendered the following year, however the US continued to fight the Moslem Moro people on the Island of Mindanao until 1914. For the next three decades the United States used the Philippines as a strategic military outpost, and preventing unrest in the islands by promising the Filipinos eventual independence, which was initially a lie as the Americans had no intention of leaving. The US was so ignorant of the Philippines that after WW2 broke out in the Pacific, Japanese invaders were welcomed by Filipinos who thought they had come to free them, this of course was not the case, and a guerilla resistance against the Japanese broke out. After the war was over the Philippines were bombed to a pulp, and the US didn't want to pay for the damages, so they granted the Philippines independence as a money-saving move.
I see that is your first post, Welcome to Historum!

Your post raises me a question, I don’t think that Aguinaldo proclaimed himself king, or at least I didn’t had that information, I had the idea that he was the first president, idea that I confirmed with a quick search in Wikipedia: Emilio Aguinaldo - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre (most of my books about the Philippines are pre-1898)

Can you confirm that he proclaimed himself king and source it?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,617
Portugal
#29
I take that as sarcasm.:upsidedown: The Philippines had been a Spanish colony since 1521.
Although the Spanish expedition led by the Portuguese Magalhães arrived to the Philippines in 1521 (Magalhães died there in that year), the colonization of the Islands took some time to begin, since the Spanish couldn’t navigate in the Indian Ocean, and an effective trade route in the Pacific (sailing from America and returning) took some time to discover. Only in the decade of 60 that was fully achieved. So the conquest begun around that date. But your main point is correct, the Philipines were mainly cristians (catholic) by 1898.
 
Nov 2010
7,266
Cornwall
#30

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