Photos: Then and Now, the Spanish Missions.

Oct 2014
1,180
California
#21
El Descanso

Because it was established in 1830, over 8 years after Mexico's independence from Spain, this mission might be considered the first Mexican mission in Baja California.

The general location was developed in 1810 as a new location for Mission San Miguel Arcángel (founded in 1787), 8 miles south. However, San Miguel returned to the former site at some point before it was abandoned in 1834.
Some ruins on the south rim of the Descanso arroyo valley may be this 1810 location.

Padre Félix Caballero was in charge of the northern Baja California mission field and it was his decision to build a new mission at Descanso, in 1830. Just 4 years later, Caballero founded Mission Guadalupe and closed Descanso and San Miguel. Within 6 years, Guadalupe would also be abandoned as Caballero barely escaped with his life during an Indian uprising.


1926 ('Fort' is the 1810 location for the moved San Miguel mission)


1936


1936


1949


2001


2017


2017
 
Jan 2018
171
San Antonio
#22
The four missions on the South Side of San Antonio Texas are working parishes in partnership with the National Park Service. They consist of a mix of stabilized ruins and restored or well maintained buildings. I volunteer a little with the NPS and visit these missions often as they lay along the bike path along the San Antonio River.
 

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Oct 2014
1,180
California
#23
The four missions on the South Side of San Antonio Texas are working parishes in partnership with the National Park Service. They consist of a mix of stabilized ruins and restored or well maintained buildings. I volunteer a little with the NPS and visit these missions often as they lay along the bike path along the San Antonio River.
Those are very cool! When San Antonio is mentioned, all we usually think of is the Alamo (which was a Spanish Mission). I have been there and enjoyed the River Walk... Good Job Texas!
 
Oct 2014
1,180
California
#24
Perhaps an uplifting look at the Baja California mission which did not fall into total ruin:

North to South:

San Borja...









San Francisco de Borja Adac was founded in 1762, three years after the hot spring of Adac being discovered. The water was drinkable after it cooled and the sulfur smell vanished. The Jesuits were removed from California in 1768 and replaced by the Franciscans until 1773 when they handed of the peninsula of Baja California to the Dominican Order.

It was under the Dominicans that this impressive stone church was built. Construction ended in 1801. A planned bell tower never added, this structure is such an impressive site in the central Baja California desert, it well worth the 22-mile unpaved road to reach. This was the 16th California mission and was abandoned in 1818 during Mexico's war for independence from Spain.
 
Oct 2014
1,180
California
#25
Santa Gertrudis...











Santa Gertrudis was founded in 1752 and was the first mission founded in a new push north made by the Jesuits once they were convinced that California was not an island and they could create a ring of missions around the gulf. Originally, this next mission was planned to be called Dolores del Norte, but when funding was made available from the closing of another mission, the name was changed to honor the wife of the benefactor.

This stone mission was constructed by the Dominicans with work completed in 1796. This is the only surviving Baja California mission with a detached bell tower. The mission was abandoned in 1822 with the victory of Mexico over Spain complete.
 
Oct 2014
1,180
California
#26
San Ignacio...







This magnificent mission church was constructed originally by the Jesuits from 1761 to their expulsion in 1768 and completed by the Dominicans from 1779 to 1786.

The mission itself was founded in 1728 with adobe being the original building material along with sticks and reeds for the roof. With the introduction of date palms from Morocco ... San Ignacio with its underground river which surfaces for two miles in this volcanic desert is quite an oasis.





More of Baja California's missions to come...
 
Oct 2014
1,180
California
#27
Loreto, the first California Mission, founded October 19, 1697.
Stone church constructed from 1740 to 1750.
Abandoned in 1829 after floods devasted the town.
The earthquake of 1877 destroyed the original bell tower. New roof and new (not-to-scale) bell tower added in 1955.

Today:


In downtown Loreto, Baja California Sur, Mexico.


Head and Mother of the Missions of Lower and Upper California.





In 1950:







Circa 1800:

 
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Oct 2014
1,180
California
#29
San Vicente Ferrer 1780-1829

As the Dominicans moved north to fill in the huge gap south of Mission San Diego de Alcalá, their third California mission was established here on a hillside above a riverbed.

Here are some historic photos/ sketches followed by new pictures at the mission.


An old photo (c1880s) of the mission site.


An artist's impression of the active mission at San Vicente.


A site plan made in 1926 by Peveril Meigs.


1949 photo by Marquis McDonald


1955 photo by Howard Gulick


2000 photo by Jack Swords
======================================================================


2017 photos by me, David Kier...







The mission park and museum is located 1 km. west from Km. 88.5 on Highway #1, south of Ensenada, just north of the town of San Vicente.
 
Oct 2014
1,180
California
#30
Santa Rosalía de Mulegé, 1705-1828

Going back to the intact stone missions of the California Peninsula, we have the mission at Mulegé, founded as the 4th California mission in November 1705. The stone church we have today was constructed from 1757 to 1766. Because flash floods were a problem in this narrow valley with its freshwater river, the new stone mission was placed on this high ledge.















Mulegé (moo-leh-HAY) is sometimes called the "Hawaii of Baja".

 
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