Pickett's charge

Lord_Cronus

Historum Emeritas
Jun 2006
1,047
Georgia
^^Agreed, and to be honest i never imagined that Lee had this in mind (to attack the flanks and then the center), did not Longstreet said to Lee the same?
There was a book on military tactics that Lee was taught at West Point, I forget the name of it, but that was basically the way it played out the battle. If you attack the flanks and fail the enemy will have to weken it's center to replenish them. But Meade was of the same school of thought.

According to what account you read, Longstreet was either against the attack altogether, or he was against Gettysburg altogether. Nobody wants to accept the blame for Gettysburg, and rightfully so because it was a very big blunder on the south's part. There was critisism on Longstreet for being slow at times, he waited for a long time on the 3d to attack leaving Ewell's corps exhausted and unable to aid in the attack from fighting all morning. Porter Alexander is blamed for the artillery attack not being as effective, to his credit, it was extremely hard to see the enemy with the humidity holding the smoke low to the ground. And Lee gets the most blame for even attacking. Lee was the only one that actually blamed himself for the debaucle. Everyone else was too busy pointing fingers
 
Jul 2006
1,315
Hellas
^^Yes, and that's why i like Lee, not in his victories but in the way he accepted his defeat and the responsibility and that think makes a man great.

As someone said "Victory has many fathers, defeat is an orphan".
 
Feb 2007
538
Ohio
Back in the day when future Civil War generals were doing their studies up at the Point, the standard text for the Military History and Strategy course was Baron Jomini. Jomini was one of Napoleon's generals. Lee, BTW, graduated Class of 1829.
 

Lord_Cronus

Historum Emeritas
Jun 2006
1,047
Georgia
There was another tactic book out there at that time and I'll have to see if I can find it, Jomini was one of them but there was another.
 
Feb 2007
538
Ohio
There was another tactic book out there at that time and I'll have to see if I can find it, Jomini was one of them but there was another.
The future Yankee general Old Brains Halleck wrote a tactics book in use when other future Civil War generals were studying up at the Point, but I think his book came too late to have been Lee's textbook.
 
Sep 2007
146
Illinois
I think it is too bad that General Longstreet was considered the most hated man in the South after the Civil war. I think the lost battle at Gettysburg was blamed on him, for no other reason than he disagreed with Lee on the strategy of the battle.
His theories of defensive strategy were way ahead of his time.
If General Lee would have listened to him, the outcome of the war may have been different.
But who knows for sure. The industrial might of the North would have been tough to beat.