Piracy/privateering on the Americas west coast - 17th century?

May 2019
96
Earth
#1
I am aware of Francis Drake's journey to the Pacific in the 16th century (which included the capture of the Nuestra Señora de la Concepción), as well as Hippolyte Bouchard's attack on California in the 19th century. But was there any European piracy/privateering on the Pacific side of the Americas during the 17th century? I would think that western Mexico and the Manilla Galleon route would make enticing targets, but I'm not aware of any incidents of European pirates/privateers operating in that region during that period, or anywhere else off the Pacific coast of the Americas.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,887
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#2
Here is a link to Wikipedia's lost of circumnavigations, including 17th century ones: List of circumnavigations - Wikipedia

One can expect that 17th century non Spanish circumnavigations had a high probability of including some anti Spanish activity one the Pacific coast of the Americas. And i tlooks like several of them did attack the Spanish on the Pacific coasts of the Americas.
 
Aug 2019
8
SPAIN
#3
Here is a link to Wikipedia's lost of circumnavigations, including 17th century ones: List of circumnavigations - Wikipedia

One can expect that 17th century non Spanish circumnavigations had a high probability of including some anti Spanish activity one the Pacific coast of the Americas. And i tlooks like several of them did attack the Spanish on the Pacific coasts of the Americas.
You´re right: Olivier van Noort - Joris van Spilbergen - Jacques l´Hermitte - William Dampier...
Here there´s a spanish link to piracy in the Pacific on this age, that gives several names: Piratas del Pacífico
 

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,363
Albuquerque, NM
#4
I believe that piracy along the Pacific coast of North and South America was pretty rare. Spanish plunder had to be transported back to Spain, and some of the richest pickings were from South America. The primary route of the Treasure Fleets were from the Gulf of Mexico, and that is where pirates clustered. From Peru, gold would have to be could be shipped south around the Horn, or across the wide Pacific. The Pacific in those days was poorly known to European navigators, but Spain held the Philippine Islands and most of the Pacific ocean empty. Potential pirates didn't have to make the perilous southern route, but could wait in wait off the Eastern coasts of the continent. Treasures were collected and a small Treasure Fleet periodically sailed west bound for Manila. Indonesia and the South China Seas were swarming with pirates, some of whom operated large fleets. For European and American pirates it was unprofitable and risky to go so far, for a prize.