Plausibility Check: An Austro-Hungarian colonial empire?

Jul 2009
9,917
#21
@Maki

Actually, by about 1914, Hungary was benefiting from both its industrial machine manufacturing and also from agricultural exports. The interest in maritime trade and also in the navy had been greatly increased from about 1904. One of the steel companies that produced armor was in Gyor (?) Hungary, and the second largest ship builder was at Fiume (Riejka). That was also where the naval academy was, and where the main torpedo manufactory was. Hungarians (and Croatians) had a larger interest in the navy than is realized - at least in the twentieth century.

Lawrence Sondhaus, The Naval Policy of Austria-Hungary, 1867-1918 (Purdue U. Press, 1994)

Milan N. Vego, Austro-Hungarian Naval Policy, 1904-14 (US Naval Institute Press, 1996)
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,068
Republika Srpska
#22
@Maki

Actually, by about 1914, Hungary was benefiting from both its industrial machine manufacturing and also from agricultural exports. The interest in maritime trade and also in the navy had been greatly increased from about 1904. One of the steel companies that produced armor was in Gyor (?) Hungary, and the second largest ship builder was at Fiume (Riejka). That was also where the naval academy was, and where the main torpedo manufactory was. Hungarians (and Croatians) had a larger interest in the navy than is realized - at least in the twentieth century.

Lawrence Sondhaus, The Naval Policy of Austria-Hungary, 1867-1918 (Purdue U. Press, 1994)

Milan N. Vego, Austro-Hungarian Naval Policy, 1904-14 (US Naval Institute Press, 1996)
Yes, but I was talking about the 1898-99 era when A-H was actually offered some colonies.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jul 2009
9,917
#23
Yeah, I also don't get it and also don't get why the Austrians were unwilling to give the Hungarians a larger share of the naval funding.
The politics of funding (what else is politics?) was always a challenge for the navy. Practical considerations also went into it. The Fiume based Danubius Engineering and Machinery Works built many smaller warships for the fleet, certainly starting in about 1904. That was their expertise, but politics required that battleships be directed the way of the Hungarian economy. That was not their expertise, and by about 1907-09 battleships were the primary focus for the navy. The Danubius Works did build one of four dreadnought BBs, but there were production issues and effects of inexperience. A further class of super dreadnoughts (not laid down in 1915 due to the war) would have been similarly affected by politics.

Whatever. Hungarian sensibilities were affected by what language was used in the navy; by how many Hungarians were officers, and blah, blah. There even had to be ships given Hungarian names as a political issue.

All that said, the navy made bulk purchases of food stuffs from Hungarian interests, and in the modern machine age, Hungarian machinery and mechanical products, and also electrical equipment, were used by the navy. Those things, important though they are, were not the big prestige items - like hot & sexy battleships.
 
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Likes: Futurist
Jul 2009
9,917
#27
@Futurist and @Maki

I just checked one of the sources, and the Diosgyor Steel Works in Hungary also manufactured artillery for the navy, but not the big guns and mountings/machinery, etc. which came from Skoda.

Also, the primary manufacturer of ammunition for naval guns was the Manfred Weiss Co., Budapest.

Almost all the telephone systems and supporting electrical gear was from Hungarian manufacturers. (Probably cheaper labor costs)
 
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Likes: Maki
Jul 2009
9,917
#28
That's assuming they could get there in force without the Russians knowing. :freeze:
Realistically, the "domain" of the K.u.K. Kriegsmarine was the Adriatic. Disciplined and efficient as it was, operations of war beyond that narrow sea were beyond its capabilities. They knew that. Its purpose was to deny control of the Adriatic to other navies, and to prevent other powers establishing themselves on the coast of Dalmatia or Albania or on any of the bizillion islands off the coast. They turned out to be pretty good at it.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,068
Republika Srpska
#29
Yes, but apart from Diosgyor, Manfred Weiss and Resicza, no other Hungarian industries had significant contracts with the navy, at least not in 1900-01. The Hungarian switch towards supporting the navy is probably the result of Hermann von Spaun's diplomacy and the renewed Italiam threat.
 
Jul 2009
9,917
#30
Yes, but apart from Diosgyor, Manfred Weiss and Resicza, no other Hungarian industries had significant contracts with the navy, at least not in 1900-01. The Hungarian switch towards supporting the navy is probably the result of Hermann von Spaun's diplomacy and the renewed Italiam threat.
Milan Vego does address that in his 1904-14 time frame, even though Spaun was succeeded by Montecuccoli in 1904. If you have ever seen a naval dock yard, there is a hell of a lot of infrastructure - including steel - that is not the ships. Locomotives and rails, cranes and big ship fitting structures, and a lot more. I can not say it came from Hungarian vendors, but as we type, I can't say it didn't. :)
 
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