Plausibility Check: The Germanization of Eastern European Jews en masse after a Central Powers WWI victory?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#51
"Germanized" Jews existed in German areal. In Hungarian areal, there were "Hungarized" Jews, in Romanian areal were "Romanized" Jews, aso.

A German "puppet" state not germanized would not "germanize" the local Jews.
That might be a fair point. I mean, Algerian Jews were only Gallicized because Algeria was officially part of France, correct? Of course, this wouldn't explain why a lot of Tunisian and Moroccan Jews also immigrated to France (as opposed to Israel or elsewhere) after these countries acquired their independence.

As I said: "When they had been accepted.... we're they ... ?
Good point. Also, No, I don't think that they were accepted in Tsarist Russia unless they converted to Christianity.
 
Oct 2013
14,266
Europix
#54
But they did not work for the Germans. I think that was the point Futurist was making.

Until the 1700s those Jews mainly worked for Polish-Lithuanian nobles and magnates.
I know. As elsewhere in the region, not just Poland.

On the "not working for Germans", IDK what You are referring to.

AFAIK, they did. There are even some tenths of thousands that fought in the German army, some ten thousand died on battle fields wearing the German uniform.

Yes, precisely. Had Germany won WWI, much of Eastern Europe could have essentially been treated as German colonies.
Being "treated as German colonies" doesn't say a lot. Especially on Germanizing the region.

I very much doubt that Germany would have started to transform/replace/force the administration, laws, schooling, aso into German.

Especially with the long lasting resilience tradition all people in the region have. A millenium of Hungarian rule, a half a Millenium of Ottoman rule, even the Soviet dominance, didn't managed to *-nize a lot, did it?

No, I don't think Jews would have "Germanized", if by that You mean assimilate.

If You just mean becoming loyal citizens, yes. They, as other minority populations in the region, were, as long as the state respected them too. It was the case with Germans in Hungary, it was the case with Turks and Tartars in Romania, for example.
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,266
Europix
#56
Interesting points, @deaf tuner! BTW, were Algerian Jews educated in French after 1870?
Well before.


Around 1830, French abolished the "dhimmi" status, Jews becoming equal with musulmans (the "dhimmi" status confered limited rights, "second level citizens", if You prefer).

Around 1870, French offered French nationality to all Jews in Algeria.

The two decisions created a strong pro-French opinion in the Jewish community.

One of the consequences was Jews followed French schools (practically since the first ones appeared in Algeria - in the 1830's).

The second consequence was a rise of the anti-Jewish sentiments in the Muslim community (Muslims weren't offered French citizenship, so, unlike Jews, they remained "second level citizens" .... ).

The third consequence is that when Algeria became independent, Jews moved en masse (mainly in France), bringing to an end the approx 2000 years of Jewish presence there.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#57
Well before.


Around 1830, French abolished the "dhimmi" status, Jews becoming equal with musulmans (the "dhimmi" status confered limited rights, "second level citizens", if You prefer).

Around 1870, French offered French nationality to all Jews in Algeria.

The two decisions created a strong pro-French opinion in the Jewish community.

One of the consequences was Jews followed French schools (practically since the first ones appeared in Algeria - in the 1830's).

The second consequence was a rise of the anti-Jewish sentiments in the Muslim community (Muslims weren't offered French citizenship, so, unlike Jews, they remained "second level citizens" .... ).

The third consequence is that when Algeria became independent, Jews moved en masse (mainly in France), bringing to an end the approx 2000 years of Jewish presence there.
That makes sense.

BTW, what about the Jews in Morocco and Tunisia?
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,266
Europix
#58
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