Police Duty to Rescue

Jun 2012
5,700
Texas
Because the US legal system is off the chain when it comes to civil liability. The actual case law came from several cases where victims of criminals sued the government for the actions of the criminals, and not stopping them earlier.
I will add, certain minority populations have had a far more negative relationship with the police. The poor, blacks, Hispanics, LGBT, libertarians, people who dispute the greatness of TexMex, etc.
 
Oct 2013
13,534
Europix
I know but I was astonished to it; that and the legalized salary disparities between EU and non-EU workers performing the same exact job with the same exact qualifications. ...
It isn't about that, it's about a continuously tension accumulating amongst the workers.

An example: in a couple of days it a general strike anounced in Belgium because the marge of negotiating wage raise decided by the government is under +1%.

Meanwhile, an oil company anounced that it will pay a prime of something like 1500 € the workers that will come working that day. I suppose You can imagine Union's reaction ...

Sounds mobster(ish) to be honest. LOL
Sounds like, smells like, looks like ...
 
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Oct 2013
13,534
Europix
I will add, certain minority populations have had a far more negative relationship with the police. The poor, blacks, Hispanics, LGBT, libertarians, people who dispute the greatness of TexMex, etc.
Well, we have Arabs, commies, nationalists ... more ore less the same thing here, just other namings.

Because the US legal system is off the chain when it comes to civil liability. The actual case law came from several cases where victims of criminals sued the government for the actions of the criminals, and not stopping them earlier.
I'd say (I might be emitting a stereotype here) that we're heading to the point where too much law will end by killing the law.

Thank You for Your time, I appreciate.
 
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Oct 2013
13,534
Europix
Its a good thing we're not talking about the French system then! ...
The OP asked:

... What about your nation? ...


...Discipline procedure against an individual LEO for professional misconduct in the US is administrative, done by the depts themselves using their own policies. Outside of that are the civil courts, where the aggrieved bring suit against the jurisdiction the LEO represented, as the LEO themselves cannot be individually charged unless gross malficence can be proven, per the qualified immunity doctrine (which you probably also wont understand). Criminal law is dictated against individuals for violations of criminal law.


Thank You for the info.

As You described them, it seems the "disciplinary procedures" aren't that different. BTW, the procedure applies to all sectors "here", not just police.



... (which you probably also wont understand). ...
You know, with all this agresivity, You might kill Your own thread ...
 
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