Police Duty to Rescue

Oct 2013
14,052
Europix
Not a single thing you posted has anything at all to do with Duty to Rescue. After all these pages, its perfectly clear you don't even understand at all what this conversation is even about. Discussion with you is like pushing a boulder up a mountain. I'm done, back on ignore you go.

What's the problem, aggienation?


Is it about:

What I want is a list of laws and case law from specific countries that prove this statement is correct:

"In the (European) countries I lived, police have as mission preventing and fighting crime too, not just investigating, apprehending criminals."

If you can't prove it, it means you made it up.
and that I posted You a couple of laws articles showing I wasn't making it up?


You're funny: it seems like You have had found in plus of the "ignore member" function the "ignore my own questions if answered" too ...
 
Oct 2013
14,052
Europix
They may have a moral duty, but there is no legal requirement for them to do so.
I am a registered qualified first aider at my place of employment but l cannot be legally forced to to assist if I don't wish to.
Interesting.

In the French code, You would be "forced two times": by the duty of assisting an endangered person applying to any person plus the obligation to provide help as specialised person (doctor, dentist, nurse, etc) stipulated in the deontological code.

On the other hand, the criminal code is protecting (it's true: limited, not totally) Your legal responsibility in case it would be engaged afterwards.
 
Last edited:

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,685
Stockport Cheshire UK
Interesting.

In the French code, You would be "forced two times": by the duty of assisting an endangered person applying to any person plus the obligation to provide help as specialised person (doctor, dentist, nurse, etc) stipulated in the deontological code.

On the other hand, the criminal code is protecting (it's true: limited, not totally) Your legal responsibility in case it would be engaged afterwards.
While under UK health and safety laws companies with more than a set number of employees must have some employees who are trained in first aid the position is voluntary, and under UK law that means I'm not compelled to act if I don't wish.

Interestingly one of the first instructions we receive in our first aid training is to not put yourself in danger, as a hurt or dead first aider is of no use to anyone
 
Oct 2013
14,052
Europix
...Interestingly one of the first instructions we receive in our first aid training is to not put yourself in danger, as a hurt or dead first aider is of no use to anyone
In all continental legislations I had time to check, that part is comprised in the law: You are not forced to act if You endangered Yourself.

While under UK health and safety laws companies with more than a set number of employees must have some employees who are trained in first aid the position is voluntary, and under UK law that means I'm not compelled to act if I don't wish. ...
AFAI understood it, the idea is that having a qualification useful in an emergency situation implies You are better prepared to handle it, thus Your obligation is stronger.

For example, if the building is in fire with people blocked inside, we are both bond to act.

- To call the 112/991/whatever. Failing to do that, it's a straight Criminal charge.
- Try to organize an evacuation. Failing to try it, I, as a security trained employee will risk harsher legal consequences than You, as first aid trained, because (theoretically), unlike You, I am trained for evacuation situations, meaning that my act could have "more positive" results.

If the emergency is a health/injury problem, it would be vice-versa.
 

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