Poll: Favorite Wife of Henry VIII

Which of Henry VIII's wives is your favorite?


  • Total voters
    18
May 2017
1,201
Syria
I realize this subject was opened before. But let's open it again.. Now back to the point;

As the title implies..

Which of Henry VIII's six unfortunate yet remarkable wives is your favorite?


I'd love to hear your opinions on the subject, as well.
 
Last edited:

paranoid marvin

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
Close one between Catherine of Aragon and Anne of Cleves. Catherine because she was a devoted wife, able deputy and brave enough to stand up to Henry and not willingly allow her daughter to become a bastard. Anne because although she was unfamiliar and completely at odds with the English court when she arrived, she learned quickly and was very astute enough to know which way the wind was blowing. Anne was the only one of his wives to come out on top. I'll go with the latter.
 
May 2017
1,201
Syria
Close one between Catherine of Aragon and Anne of Cleves. Catherine because she was a devoted wife, able deputy and brave enough to stand up to Henry and not willingly allow her daughter to become a bastard. Anne because although she was unfamiliar and completely at odds with the English court when she arrived, she learned quickly and was very astute enough to know which way the wind was blowing. Anne was the only one of his wives to come out on top. I'll go with the latter.
I completely agree. I truly believe that Anne of Cleves was extremely remarkable and intelligent and had the sense to get out of her marriage when she saw the opportunity and is probably the true survivor among Henry's wives.

But I'll always prefer Catherine. She was truly a courageous woman of principle who remained regal, dignified and kept her faith even while being humiliated and later discarded by Henry.
 
Aug 2012
1,554
Where I live, Anne Boleyn's family once held power. Even to this day, we remember her, and her name lives on in streets, cafes, even a famous pub. I grew up hearing about her, and reading about her story I was very impressed by both her high learning and ambition to wield power. So I suppose, due to cultural ties, I would always say she was my favourite.
 
May 2017
1,201
Syria
Where I live, Anne Boleyn's family once held power. Even to this day, we remember her, and her name lives on in streets, cafes, even a famous pub. I grew up hearing about her, and reading about her story I was very impressed by both her high learning and ambition to wield power. So I suppose, due to cultural ties, I would always say she was my favourite.
You're from Essex, I trust?
 

paranoid marvin

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
Indeed, so! Southend, specifically, so her family had an estate but a stones throw away in Rochford, where I myself was born.
I've neen to Hever Castle, and whilst it's not the most imposing of fortresses, the grounds are absolutely stunning. One thing I found fascinating was the letter which is in the upper gallery, written to Henry when Anne was imprisoned. It is in parts pleading, asking for a fair trial and that those innocents co-accused be forgiven, part prescient when she talks of her Enemies sitting in judgement on her and part warning that if Henry fixes the trial so she loses, that he will have to one day answer to God for it.

I had never heard of the letter before, and it was worth the trip to the beautiful village of Hever just to see it.
 

paranoid marvin

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
As for AB herself, I suspect her enyitely innocent of what she was accused. But she was guilty of trusting her husband. Whilst she was in favour and likely to be Henry a son, she could just about get away with advising him on state matters, in particular matters of faith. She didn't realise that continuing to do so when she was out of favour greatly angered Henry, and made yhe decision to get rid of her far easier.

Personally I think that if she had been given the option to be divorced from Henry and forced to go into a nunnery or whatever she would have taken it. But Cromwell was not one for allowing opponents any chance of a comeback, and ensured she was executed.
 
May 2017
1,201
Syria
Personally I think that if she had been given the option to be divorced from Henry and forced to go into a nunnery or whatever she would have taken it. But Cromwell was not one for allowing opponents any chance of a comeback, and ensured she was executed.
Yes, when she was visited by Cranmer about 3 days before her execution, and the constable of the tower of London reported to Cromwell that "this day at dinner the queen said that she should go to a nunnery and is in hope of life".

As for Cromwell, I really don't believe that the fall of Anne was entirely his doing. I doubt he would have had the courage to conspire against the queen without the king's blessing, who was already quite fed up with Anne, and was already enamored with Jane Seymour. Moreover, British author Gareth Rusell also wrote that the events of May 1536 "lacked any of Cromwell’s usual slow, brilliant, relentless tactics, and was instead a swift, brutal mess".

There's no denying Cromwell had a hand in Anne's downfall but I think at the end he was just doing Henry's bidding.
 

paranoid marvin

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
Yes, when she was visited by Cranmer about 3 days before her execution, and the constable of the tower of London reported to Cromwell that "this day at dinner the queen said that she should go to a nunnery and is in hope of life".

As for Cromwell, I really don't believe that the fall of Anne was entirely his doing. I doubt he would have had the courage to conspire against the queen without the king's blessing, who was already quite fed up with Anne, and was already enamored with Jane Seymour. Moreover, British author Gareth Rusell also wrote that the events of May 1536 "lacked any of Cromwell’s usual slow, brilliant, relentless tactics, and was instead a swift, brutal mess".

There's no denying Cromwell had a hand in Anne's downfall but I think at the end he was just doing Henry's bidding.
Absolutely Cromwell was only doing what his master wanted. Anne had been a useful ally in getting the king to move away from the Catholic faith. But as soon as he realised that Henry had moved on to Jane, his position changed.

Perhaps Cromwell could have persuaded his master to stick with Anne and simply take Jane as a mistress, but why bother to risk his neck when it was easier to go along with Henry. Anyway, he had seen what had happened to those who had been opposed to the divorce of the last queen (including his own former mentor Wolsey).

Personally I think the job done on Anne was definitely overseen by Cromwell. Lots of people implicated (so he could settle a few scores) and anyone who dared to challenge the, frankly quite outrageous and unbelievable charhes, risked being brought into the conspiracy. I don't think anyone was in doubt about who wanted what and what the verdict would be (including Anne), and this in part was what led many at court to hate Cromwell. Ultimately this meant that when he tripped up himself, everyone was out to stick the knife in.