Populations (ethnic groups, religious groups, and/or et cetera) that have experienced a massive shift in their locations over time?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#1
What I find fascinating is that in 1800 almost no Jews lived in either North America or Palestine whereas nowadays over 80% of the world's Jewish population live in these regions. Granted, some of this was due to the Holocaust decimating most of Eastern European Jewry, but a majority of the Jews within the Soviet Union's 1938 borders survived the Holocaust and yet nevertheless subsequently emigrated--largely either to Israel or to North America (especially the US). Likewise, the Jews in the Muslim world were not affected by the Holocaust and yet almost all of them likewise subsequently emigrated--and mostly to Israel. This trend is only likely to continue in the future as a result of Israel's high Jewish TFR while Jewry in the rest of the world reproduces much less than their Israeli counterparts.

Anyway, which other populations have experienced a massive shift in their locations over time? For instance, I know that a lot of Blacks moved out of the Southern US during the Great Migration (1910 to 1970), but even after the end of the Great Migration, a majority of Blacks in the US continued to live in the Southern US:



Do you know of any examples of this other than the Jews?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,099
Republika Srpska
#2
Well, there are Serb migrations from the 15th to the 18th centuries that led to Serbs leaving the Ottoman Empire and the old centre of the Serb state and moving to the north and west to Habsburg lands in Hungary and Croatia. This led to the fact that today there are almost no Serbs in places like Kosovo, while they were previously the absolute majority.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#4
Should we count incidences where the population was largely eradicated such as the Holocaust, or the Westward Expansion of the USA? Would Palestine/Israel count regardless?
Yes, we should.

Also, even without the Holocaust (or with a much smaller Holocaust), this effect could still be felt considering that a lot of Jews already ended up in North America before 1940 and considering that a lot of Jews were probably clamoring to leave Eastern Europe even before 1933--with Palestine being an attractive destination since the US's doors became largely closed in 1924 and since other countries weren't exactly welcoming to large numbers of Jewish immigrants either during this time.

Well, there are Serb migrations from the 15th to the 18th centuries that led to Serbs leaving the Ottoman Empire and the old centre of the Serb state and moving to the north and west to Habsburg lands in Hungary and Croatia. This led to the fact that today there are almost no Serbs in places like Kosovo, while they were previously the absolute majority.
What was the old center of the Serb state?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,570
Portugal
#9
The Barbarian tribes that frequently invaded Roman territory (from the Celts to the Cimbri and Goths…), and even in a more generic view, the Indo-European migrations. Regarding to Portuguese territory, the Lusitanians.

The Hebrews.

The Hyksos.

The Oromo migration to Ethiopia in the 16th century.

These were the first that came to my mind.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#10
Niš was also a part of the Serb medieval state, though not always.
What about Belgrade?

There was always a small Jewish presence in Palestine. During the early 19th century it numbered perhaps a few thousand, but it still existed.
Yes, I know, but it was what? Less than 1% of the world's total Jewish population? Compare this with Israel's 40+% share of the world's total Jewish population right now. There's absolutely no comparison!

The Barbarian tribes that frequently invaded Roman territory (from the Celts to the Cimbri and Goths…), and even in a more generic view, the Indo-European migrations. Regarding to Portuguese territory, the Lusitanians.

The Hebrews.

The Hyksos.

The Oromo migration to Ethiopia in the 16th century.

These were the first that came to my mind.
Who are the Lusatians?