Portrayal of Hats in Middle Ages Fantasy

Apr 2017
1,613
U.S.A.
My understanding of the Middle ages in Europe was that wearing hats was very common and to a certain degree expected outside. However in pretty much all depictions of the middle ages or fantasy worlds inspired by it, there is a almost total lack of hat wearing (aside from older Robin Hood movies). You see extensive helmets and hoods in media and occasionally a wide brimmed hat (favored by witch hunters) but aside from Robin hood Bycockets and various hair coverings for women, there is an almost complete lack of hat depiction. Can anyone think of any semi-accurate portrayal of hats in middle ages inspired media (excluding helmets, arming caps and hoods)?
 
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Aug 2019
92
Livingston 62° 38′ 27″ S, 60° 22′ 0.98″ W
The modern notion of a lady's hat is too difficult to relate to the medieval genin with which ladies from Europe in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries decorated their heads. What is Henin? It was an entire or intersecting funnel made of lightweight material, to which thin veils were attached in the most bizarre way. Henin took on the most complex forms in the Burgundy court. They say that in the sixteenth century in Britain, a girl envied her fiancé for his pretty, feather-hat, weighed it and ... appropriated it. Until then, women covered their heads with scarves, headscarves, hoods, thus preserving their hair from rain and wind and their heads from cold. Women in England soon turned the stolen men's hat into decoration for their heads. We can also judge the hats of German women during the Renaissance by the engravings and drawings of the great humanist and artist Albrecht Durer. Too often, women's heads are wrapped in turbans.
hennin1memling.jpg
buch2-435.jpg
hat-535x763.jpg
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,708
SoCal
My understanding of the Middle ages in Europe was that wearing hats was very common and to a certain degree expected outside. However in pretty much all depictions of the middle ages or fantasy worlds inspired by it, there is a almost total lack of hat wearing (aside from older Robin Hood movies). You see extensive helmets and hoods in media and occasionally a wide brimmed hat (favored by witch hunters) but aside from Robin hood Bycockets and various hair coverings for women, there is an almost complete lack of hat depiction. Can anyone think of any semi-accurate portrayal of hats in middle ages inspired media (excluding helmets, arming caps and hoods)?
Here's Charles VI of France:



Here's Charles VII of France:



Here's Louis XI of France:



Here's Charles VIII of France:



Here's Louis XII of France:



Here's Francis I of France:



Here are two paintings of Italo-Flemish merchant Giovanni Arnolfini:





Here's Louis de Bourbon, Count of Vendome:



Here's Francois de Bourbon, Count of Vendome:



Here's Robert, Count of Clermont:



Here's Louis I, Duke of Bourbon:



Here's Peter I, Duke of Bourbon:



Here's Louis II, Duke of Bourbon:



Here's John I, Duke of Bourbon:



Here's John II, Duke of Bourbon:

 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,708
SoCal
Here are two paintings of Peter II, Duke of Bourbon:





Here's Gilbert de Bourbon, Count of Montpensier:



Here are two paintings of Charles III, Duke of Bourbon:



 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,708
SoCal
BTW, are you limiting this question to people who were born before 1500, @Visigoth Panzer? Or do you have a different time-frame in mind here? Personally, I limited my pictures here to people who were actually born before 1500.
 
Feb 2019
831
Pennsylvania, US
The modern notion of a lady's hat is too difficult to relate to the medieval genin with which ladies from Europe in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries decorated their heads. What is Henin? It was an entire or intersecting funnel made of lightweight material, to which thin veils were attached in the most bizarre way. Henin took on the most complex forms in the Burgundy court. They say that in the sixteenth century in Britain, a girl envied her fiancé for his pretty, feather-hat, weighed it and ... appropriated it. Until then, women covered their heads with scarves, headscarves, hoods, thus preserving their hair from rain and wind and their heads from cold. Women in England soon turned the stolen men's hat into decoration for their heads. We can also judge the hats of German women during the Renaissance by the engravings and drawings of the great humanist and artist Albrecht Durer. Too often, women's heads are wrapped in turbans.
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Covering the hair was essential - especially for married women - as loose hair was associated with all sorts of sordid things (loose morals, witchcraft, you name it). Women were shaving their hairlines higher and higher with the fashion.

I've never heard that the hennin could be traced back to envying a man's hat... but that's an interesting theory. Usually the hennin is thought to be modeled after the Mongolian Ku-ku or Boqta headdress... a hat that was exclusively female, as men and women's clothing were identical. The European hennin was worn with the cone on the back of the head... the hat itself makes it impossible to do much work, so it would be associated with a sort of privileged lifestyle / wealth. Most working women would wear a wimple (draped cloth cover the neck and chin and hair).
 
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