Post-Vedic Republics of North-Western India

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,487
New Delhi, India
#81
Youdheyas

According to Curtius they were called Sambracae or Sabracae; according to Orosius Sabagrae; and according to Diodorus, who placed them to the east of the river, Sambastae. They were a powerful nation, second to none in India for courage and numbers. Their forces consisted of 60,000 foot, 6000 horse, and 500 chariots. The military reputation of the clan suggests the probability that the Greek name may be descriptive of their warlike character, just as Yaudheya means "warrior or soldier." I think, therefore, that the true Greek name may have been Sambagra, for the Sanskrit Samvagri, that is, the "united warriors," which, as they were formed of three allied tribes, would have been an appropriate appellation. In confirmation of this suggestion, I may note the fact that the country of which Bikaner is now the capital was originally called Bagar-des, or the land of the Bagri, or " Warriors," whose leader was Bagri Rao. Bhati also means "warrior or soldier." We thus find three tribes at the present day, all calling themselves "warriors," who form a large proportion of the population in the countries to the east of the Satluj; namely, Johiyas or Yaudheyas along the river, Bagris in Bikaner, and Bhatis in Jaisalmer.

All three are of acknowledged Lunar descent; and if my suggested interpretation of Sambagri be correct, it is possible that the name might have been applied to these three clans, and not to the three tribes of the Yaudheyas. I think, however, that the Yaudheyas have a superior claim, both on account of their position along the banks of the Satluj, and of their undoubted antiquity. To them I would attribute the foundation of the town of Ajudhan, or Ayodhanam, the "battle-field," which is evidently connected with their own name of Yaudheya, or Ajudhiya the " warriors." The latter form of the name is most probably preserved in the Ossadii of Arrian, a free people, who tendered their allegiance to Alexander at the confluence of the Panjab rivers. The Ossadii of Arrian would therefore correspond with the Sambastae of Diodorus and the Sambracae of Curtius, who made their submission to Alexander at the same place. Now Ossadioi or Assodioi is as close a rendering of Ajudhiya as could be made in Greek characters. We have thus a double correspondence both of name and position in favour of my identification of the Sabagrae or Sambraece with the Johiyas of the present day.

Ajudhan or Ayodhya is present day Pak Patan in Pakistan. Here Alexander came after Multan and traveled to Uchh via Ludhan (I have not been able to find it), Mailsi, Kahror (Gojra) and Lodharan. Here Perdekkas who had gone towards Harappa and Niarchus, chief of his navy joined him. Ayodhya means "what cannot be fought with". Mattamayuras will mean those who are as carefree/unafraid as peacocks engaged in their mating dance.
 

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Last edited:
Jan 2016
1,637
India
#82
Youdheyas

According to Curtius they were called Sambracae or Sabracae; according to Orosius Sabagrae; and according to Diodorus, who placed them to the east of the river, Sambastae. They were a powerful nation, second to none in India for courage and numbers. Their forces consisted of 60,000 foot, 6000 horse, and 500 chariots. The military reputation of the clan suggests the probability that the Greek name may be descriptive of their warlike character, just as Yaudheya means "warrior or soldier." I think, therefore, that the true Greek name may have been Sambagra, for the Sanskrit Samvagri, that is, the "united warriors," which, as they were formed of three allied tribes, would have been an appropriate appellation. In confirmation of this suggestion, I may note the fact that the country of which Bikaner is now the capital was originally called Bagar-des, or the land of the Bagri, or " Warriors," whose leader was Bagri Rao. Bhati also means "warrior or soldier." We thus find three tribes at the present day, all calling themselves "warriors," who form a large proportion of the population in the countries to the east of the Satluj; namely, Johiyas or Yaudheyas along the river, Bagris in Bikaner, and Bhatis in Jaisalmer.

All three are of acknowledged Lunar descent; and if my suggested interpretation of Sambagri be correct, it is possible that the name might have been applied to these three clans, and not to the three tribes of the Yaudheyas. I think, however, that the Yaudheyas have a superior claim, both on account of their position along the banks of the Satluj, and of their undoubted antiquity. To them I would attribute the foundation of the town of Ajudhan, or Ayodhanam, the "battle-field," which is evidently connected with their own name of Yaudheya, or Ajudhiya the " warriors." The latter form of the name is most probably preserved in the Ossadii of Arrian, a free people, who tendered their allegiance to Alexander at the confluence of the Panjab rivers. The Ossadii of Arrian would therefore correspond with the Sambastae of Diodorus and the Sambracae of Curtius, who made their submission to Alexander at the same place. Now Ossadioi or Assodioi is as close a rendering of Ajudhiya as could be made in Greek characters. We have thus a double correspondence both of name and position in favour of my identification of the Sabagrae or Sambraece with the Johiyas of the present day.

Ajudhan or Ayodhya is present day Pak Patan in Pakistan. Here Alexander came after Multan and traveled to Uchh via Ludhan (I have not been able to find it), Mailsi, Kahror (Gojra) and Lodharan. Here Perdekkas who had gone towards Harappa and Niarchus, chief of his navy joined him. Ayodhya means "what cannot be fought with".Mattamayuras will mean those who are as carefree/unafraid as peacocks engaged in their mating dance.
When you are copying and pasting from somewhere, at least put the text inside quotes and write the link to your source.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,487
New Delhi, India
#83
Sorry. This was from Alexander Cunningham book "Ancient Geography of India", one of my fv. books, except for the last paragraph which I have added.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,487
New Delhi, India
#85
I do not know about 'Vedic Mathematics and view it a little suspiciously as to whether it can be useful in present era. Mostly I see it as a money-spinning franchise trying to take advantage of parents anxious to make their children into geniuses.