Pre-plague (pre 1348) England was more important country than Elisabeth I era England

Nov 2017
866
Győr
Hi!

My first point:
Pre 1348 England shared much larger ratio of population if you compare England with the total contemporary total European population.

Second point:
Its military was also more stronger than Elizabeth era England's military potential. (I mean as a continental field army power)


Share you opinion!

Thanks!
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,643
Las Vegas, NV USA
Hi!

My first point:
Pre 1348 England shared much larger ratio of population if you compare England with the total contemporary total European population.

Second point:
Its military was also more stronger than Elizabeth era England's military potential. (I mean as a continental field army power)


Share you opinion!

Thanks!
During the time of Edward III I do believe England was stronger in relative terms than in Tudor times. Most of southwestern France was under his authority whereas the Tudors only ruled England. All French possessions had been lost and the new age of commercial empires was just getting underway. The reign of Edward III extended from before to after the Black Death.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_III_of_England
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
But why isn't that represented in English history textbooks in schools?

I think they mostly speak about Tudor era England, which was less powerful in European comparison than Edwardian England in its own time.
 
Last edited:

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,643
Las Vegas, NV USA
But why isn't that represented in English history textbooks in schools?

I think they mostly speak about Tudor era England, which was less powerful in European comparison than Edwardian England in its own time.
There was a lot going on in the Tudor era and it's closer to modern English/British history is my guess: the Protestant Reformation, the brief and bloody Counter-Reformation and the reign Elizebeth I where the arts (Shakespeare) and
sciences (Bacon) flourished. The Spanish Armada was defeated and the foundations of the future British Empire were laid at this time with the investment in sea power.

BTW the term "Edwardian" is usually reserved for the reign of Edward VII (1901-1910).

PS. Also for some reason Shakespeare didn't write a play about Edward III, so he can't be that important :)
 
Last edited:
Nov 2017
866
Győr
There was a lot going on in the Tudor era and it's closer to modern English/British history is my guess: the Protestant Reformation, the brief and bloody Counter-Reformation and the reign Elizebeth I where the arts (Shakespeare) and
sciences (Bacon) flourished. The Spanish Armada was defeated and the foundations of the future British Empire were laid at this time with the investment in sea power.

BTW the term "Edwardian" is usually reserved for the reign of Edward VII (1901-1910).

PS. Also for some reason Shakespeare didn't write a play about Edward III, so he can't be that important :)
The path which was paved during the reign of Elizabeth proved to be determinant only in the future., but it does not change the fact, that England was much more powerful country before 1348, than during the Elizabeth era.
 
Last edited:

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,643
Las Vegas, NV USA
The path which was paved during the reign of Elizabeth proved to be determinant only in the future., but it does not change the fact, that England was much more powerful country before 1348, than during the Elizabeth era.
I agree. You could argue Edward's successes continued after the Black Death. The Treaty of Brétigny (1360) might be considered a high water mark.
 
Last edited:

jackydee

Ad Honorem
Jan 2013
4,569
Brigadoon
But why isn't that represented in English history textbooks in schools?

I think they mostly speak about Tudor era England, which was less powerful in European comparison than Edwardian England in its own time.
Why should it be represented in English textbooks? Btw how many English textbooks have you personally read?

We are generally taught that England was a bit of a backwater during the Tudor period, pretty much as it had been since the beginning of time. Other than that it's pretty hard to prove in which period England was most powerful up until the early modern period. We get just about the correct narrative.

Also, how do you accurately compare the power of Edwardian England to the time of the Spanish Armada, the Eighty Years War, and the general Reformation period? It's all largely down to subjective opinion. If it's mostly subjective it should not be emphasized in textbooks as fact.
 
Nov 2017
866
Győr
Why should it be represented in English textbooks? Btw how many English textbooks have you personally read?

We are generally taught that England was a bit of a backwater during the Tudor period, pretty much as it had been since the beginning of time. Other than that it's pretty hard to prove in which period England was most powerful up until the early modern period. We get just about the correct narrative.

Also, how do you accurately compare the power of Edwardian England to the time of the Spanish Armada, the Eighty Years War, and the general Reformation period? It's all largely down to subjective opinion. If it's mostly subjective it should not be emphasized in textbooks as fact.
We can accurately compare in military and economic terms. Medieval England had larger population (relative to the European total population) and larger field armies, and more important victories in Continental Europe than Tudor era England.
 

jackydee

Ad Honorem
Jan 2013
4,569
Brigadoon
The path which was paved during the reign of Elizabeth proved to be determinant only in the future., but it does not change the fact, that England was much more powerful country before 1348, than during the Elizabeth era.
More powerful does not necessarily equate to more significant. I do not wish to bring contemporary politics into this but it seems a Brexit comparison is apt here. Is Britain a more important state in the EU or out? Is Britain a more significant state now it has left? I'll be damned if I know the answer to this and im fairly sure you don't know the answer either. It is a matter of opinion.