Previously underpopulated territories that acquired huge populations as a result of mass migration

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#21
The Sahel was trading with the Arab world and Italians and there was of course gold mining. Throughout history miners have often been forced laborers. Though possibly I'm misusing the term Sahel here? Will have to read some more about the era and the trade routes.
So, Sub-Saharan African slaves were imported into the Sahel?

Also, this is the Sahel:

 

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,058
Santiago de Chile
#22
Large parts of south america were absolutely underpopulated and then populated by South American and European immigrants and their descendants during the 19th century, especially the second half, but it's a contentious issue seeing as underpopulated or not populated was the excuse to give large land grants to Europeans and others in area that was at least thinly populated already by native tribes. The Colonization of the Chilean south follows this pattern in the lake district and the far south, again a contentious issue to this day. I don't know if huge populations is the word to describe these areas but the populations are a lot larger today than they ever were to my knowledge during pre-columbian times.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#24
Large parts of south america were absolutely underpopulated and then populated by South American and European immigrants and their descendants during the 19th century, especially the second half, but it's a contentious issue seeing as underpopulated or not populated was the excuse to give large land grants to Europeans and others in area that was at least thinly populated already by native tribes. The Colonization of the Chilean south follows this pattern in the lake district and the far south, again a contentious issue to this day. I don't know if huge populations is the word to describe these areas but the populations are a lot larger today than they ever were to my knowledge during pre-columbian times.
Do you know of any maps that show how the population density in South America changed over time?

Yeah, their population grew by a whopping 11% between 2010 and 2018. That's very strong! From 45 to 50 people! :D
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#30
Dividing by zero = infinity.
OK; that makes sense.

BTW, would it be OK for me to create a separate thread to post interactive and/or animated maps showing how the population and/or population density in various places (such as various counties in the US) changed over time? I am asking you about this because I want to get your permission for this before actually doing this.