Previously underpopulated territories that acquired huge populations as a result of mass migration

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#41
It's a ridiculous premise to claim to be history.
And what makes historical films more meaningful than historical animated cartoons/historical animated films? Is it their deeper meaning and message? Richer storyline? Larger and more prominent themes? Something else?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
34,578
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#42
And what makes historical films more meaningful than historical animated cartoons/historical animated films? Is it their deeper meaning and message? Richer storyline? Larger and more prominent themes? Something else?
Which part of "Do you like Donald or Daffy Duck" do you think is history?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#43
It's history in the sense that it involves people thinking about which pre-1991 cartoons they like better--those with Donald Duck or those with Daffy Duck.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,091
SoCal
#44
Also, is it history to ask people which Marx Brothers films they liked best? If so, how is this meaningfully different from asking which pre-1991 cartoon characters (as in, the films and cartoons that they appeared in from 1991 or earlier) out of the ones that I mentioned people like best?
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,050
Canary Islands-Spain
#47
All of the Americas, Hawaii, New Zealand, the entire Russian steppe, Siberia, Taiwan, Cape Verde, the Gulf states, Jordan, Most of Russia really, inner Mongolia, possibly others.
Hawaii was well populated before the European contact. A medium-high stimation of 683,000 people in 1778 After 200 years, Native Hawaiians make a comeback gives a density of 24.1 pop./km2, a bit higher than France. When the islands were annexed by the US in 1898, the population was booming again passing from 109,020 in 1896 to 154,001 in 1900 Research Guides: Hawaiʻi - Censuses: Historical Censuses (first mass migration?) Even during the low peak of mid 19th century, with 56,897 people, I think the islands were far from true underpopulated areas of the world. As a side note, I think the evolution of Hawaii seem to be more akin to Mexico or other Latinamerican nations
 
Likes: Futurist

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,058
Santiago de Chile
#48
"At that time" meaning in 1880?

Also, this thread of mine might interest you:

Maps that compare the population density and/or population in various countries/areas over time

In that thread, among other links, I've posted a link that has maps of Latin America's population density in 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000.
At the time meaning anything from roughly 1850-1910 give or take. It was a long process so to speak. Lot's of those territories are still thinly populated when compared to more central areas of the country. But since they were so sparsely populated at the time by indigenous people's any amount of immigration and settlers there was bound to shoot the numbers up statistically speaking. I think that one of our own version of the homestead act might even still legally be in place in one of these regions but I couldn't find information on the topic, I heard it in passing from somebody almost twenty years ago.
 
Likes: Futurist