Qing Naval forces in Manchuria?

Sep 2018
58
transitory
#1
I know that after the fall of the Qing, the Fengtien Clique had some naval forces in Manchuria. But I am curious if the Qing government had any naval forces based in this region before 1911, especially during the 19th century?

Beiyang Fleet was based in Shandong from what I read; I'm not sure if any of their vessels had bases in Manchuria (e.g. Liaodong peninsula). Also, I don't know if the Qing maybe had some patrol vessels on the Amur river after the Aigun Treaty to guard the new border with Russia?

I did see this one mention of Qing naval forces in Manchuria during the 17th century, but I don't know anything else about it, or even if it is true:

"In 1661, a naval unit was estabalished at Jilin to defend against Russian incursions into Manchuria. Naval units were also added to various Banner garrisons subsequently, referred to collectively as the "Eight Banners Navy"."
source: Imperial Chinese Navy - Wikipedia
 
Oct 2018
137
China
#4
Beiyang Navy Port includes Lushun Port and Weihaiwei Port. Lushun is the maintenance and repair port of Beiyang Navy. Weihaiwei is the permanent berth of Beiyang Navy.
 
Sep 2018
58
transitory
#5
Interesting, thank you for the info. Did the Qing Navy lose access to Lushun Port after Russia took the lease on Dalian in 1898?
 
Sep 2018
58
transitory
#10
Regarding Qing use of riverboats against Russians, I recently found this quote:

In 1652, the Russians moved out of their settlements in Siberia and invaded Amur Valley in Manchuria. In 1654, the Russians tried to take their boats up the Sungari River, a tributary of the Amur. In the spring of 1658, a Manchu fleet of river boats equipped with cannons defeated the Muscovite invasion.
Source: Military Transition in Early Modern Asia, 1400-1750: Cavalry, Guns, Government, and Ships by Kaushik Roy, pg. 123

Also, there is this wikipedia page which talks about Ningguta (Ning'an) being an important port and construction yard for Manchu river fleets, and mentions a 1658 battle against Russians: Ning'an - Wikipedia

The suitability of Ninguta as an administrative center was in part due to its location on the Hurka River (or, for the original site, on the Hurka's tributary Hailang), which provided a convenient transportation route connecting Ninguta with the lower Sungari and the lower Amur River. Early on, a great dockyard operated in Ninguta, building boats for the Mudanjiang/Sungari/Amur river system, although it was later relocated to Jilin City.

In 1658 Sarhuda, in charge of a Manchu fleet of several dozen ships, and including also General Shin Ryu's Korean force, sailed from Ninguta down the Hurka and the Sungari, to defeat the smaller fleet of the Russian Cossack Onufriy Stepanov near the fall of the Sungari into the Amur.
If anyone has more details about the dockyards in Ningguta, the boats operating from there, or these river battles against Russians (such as the one in 1658), please share.
 

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