Questions regarding clarification of Texas American Histiry

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,590
Dispargum
Could you explain, what you mean with that Texas failed because its size?
I always thought, the reason for its failure was that, when Mirabeau Lamar became president and reversed the policies of Houston. He wanted the goal of total extinction of the indians. First he went after the Cherokee and then attacked the Comanche. But the Comancheria was nearly a great power. After the council house massaker during the peace talks, the troops of the Comancheria managed to destroy Linneville, the second bigest port city of Texas in 1840. That is bad for trade. Lamar constantly pumped more money into the war effort, than Texas made. This source (Mirabeau B. Lamar | TSLAC) says that during his turn, Texas collected 1 million dollar in taxes, but spent almost 5 million dollars. So my impression was that Texas was simply broke, so they had to join their bigger neighbour.
I would guess that he means the tax base was too small. The large size of Texas with all of its hostile peoples (both Indians and Mexicans) required a large army that the small population could not afford.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,562
Las Vegas, NV USA
Could you explain, what you mean with that Texas failed because its size?
"Despite its size (or maybe because of it) it failed and desperately sought admission to the US but was.........."

It was stated as a possibility, not as a fact or even as very likely. To adequately service and defend such a large area could be a burden if not ignored. In fact I doubt the Republic ever considered patrolling or ever defending its remotest areas. The Comanche roamed freely over large parts of Texas and for all practical purposes, Texas did not exist for them.
 
Dec 2017
312
Regnum Teutonicum
Thank you for the clarification.
Well of course the Comanche roamed free over large parts of Texas, because they were not part of Texas, but of the Comancheria, until it was taken from the Comancheria in the late 1840's and given to Texas.

Comancheria - Wikipedia
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,704
San Antonio, Tx
Wow. Where to even begin. :eek: How about a sincere kudos for your intellectual curiosity, desire to dig down a little deeper, and assumption of personal responsibility for your education. :party: May I not so humbly suggest that you spend less time on that "Wiki." There are a great many books about these topics; however, since you're already in Texas you can actually visit many of the places where much of these events took place. Texas has some wonderfully preserved historical areas. Obviously The Alamo. Sacred ground for any Texan. :halo: It is a great place to visit and revisit. Phil Collins gathered an extensive collection of Texas artifacts which he donated to... some historical society or another. I don't think the donation was to the State of Texas. Either way, those artifacts will be housed in a new display at Alamo Square. Perhaps construction is already completed. I don't know. There are three other missions south of the Alamo. All are in San Antonio and you can even ride a bike on a very nice path along the river to each of them. In fact, as far as I'm concerned, Mission San Jose is more impressive and more beautiful, far more beautiful than the Alamo. There is also San Jacinto just south of Houston. The Capitol in Austin is full of photos, paintings, and many other historical items and because in Texas the legislature only convenes every other year, in off years, the Capitol is completely open and accessible. Go take a few trips. Spend some time wandering among the relics of your past. Take your time. It's a journey. Go where your curiosity guides you. Books, monuments, museums, historical forums, etc. are your friends. BTW, Lockhart is on the way form San Antonio to Houston. Despite it's relative lack of historical endowment, it is blessed with the best barbeque in the world! Now that's a fact! :nerd:
I believe there are four missions aside from the Alamo which is the only one that is not part of the Catholic Diocese of San Antonio because it was abandoned (and deconsecrated) by the Church before the battle of the Alamo. The issue of what to do with Alamo Plaza is a very contentious one since the state took over the Alamo Grounds in a very shady move some years ago. My company worked on the restoration of the Alamo for years as many became available.
 
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royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,704
San Antonio, Tx
"Despite its size (or maybe because of it) it failed and desperately sought admission to the US but was.........."

It was stated as a possibility, not as a fact or even as very likely. To adequately service and defend such a large area could be a burden if not ignored. In fact I doubt the Republic ever considered patrolling or ever defending its remotest areas. The Comanche roamed freely over large parts of Texas and for all practical purposes, Texas did not exist for them.
At one time, Texas was “much bigger” than its present borders, but I’m of the opinion that these “borders” at the time were more notional than anything else. No way was that going to cut it for the US government which told Texas to get real about its true extent or it would never be accepted into the Union. Even then, the state was slightly reduced in size because anything beyond a certain latitude couldn’t be a slave state. The slavery issue had become contentious and the earlier east coast backers of Texas’ entry into the union had cooled their jets by that time. At the time of Texas’ statehood, the state was not really pacified - it was just too big and full of too many Comanche and Apache warriors who didn’t give a flying fig for state borders.

Texas had actually petitioned then president Jackson to become a state even before it had won its independence from Mexico but Jackson would not do it because we had a treaty with Mexico at the time.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,704
San Antonio, Tx
The best b

The best book on Texas history I have ever had the pleasure of reading is Lone Star by T R Fehrenbach. The author passed away here several years ago.
 
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May 2019
202
Salt Lake City, Utah
CuriousCubit, your " But they could have been happy under Mexican Rule if all terms were met, right? " is a great interrogative.

The answer is No. The war was fought on the lines of religion, language, race, culture, and politics.

The Texian Army was overwhelmingly 'dixie back', meaning the soldiers had 'swum' the Sabine and Red to enter Texas.
 
May 2019
202
Salt Lake City, Utah
You will want to read Texas: All Hail the Mighty State by Archie P. McDonald. It is dated (1983), but still a well-organized and logical read for Texas history.