Rank these well known but less discussed military leaders

Oct 2016
1,088
Merryland
#5
Thomas J. 'Stonewall' Jackson was arguably the greatest military genius the USA (and CSA) has ever produced. His renowned 'foot cavalry' tied up huge forces and his tactical skill enabled Robert E. Lee to trap a numerically larger Federal army at Chancellorsville. I'm sure had he been alive he would have enabled the rebels to win at Gettysburg.


not sure he would be considered 'not well known'.

Rommel is very well known.

Petain was one of the better commanders in WWI, which is faint praise.

I vaguely remember Messena as competent. nothing specific.

never heard of Monash.
 
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Jul 2018
497
Hong Kong
#6
Sin Rip (申砬) — renowned for his foolhardy "cavalry charge" against the ferocious Japanese arquebuses fire in Tangumdae (彈琴臺).

Alexander Sukorov — the Russian great military commander in the pre-Napoleonic Era, extremely favored the "bayonet charge" since it represents the infantry's real spirit.

Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝賴) — too many people only focused on his blunder in Nagashino, neglected his other campaigns / battles. Many perhaps did not even know he ever "defeated" Oda Nobunaga in the Battle of Akechi (AD 1574) and conquered the impregnable Takatenjin Castle (AD 1574) for which even his father had failed to subdue !

Suleiman the Magnificent — I really never see many people discussed his military command.

Nikolai Vatutin — a famous Soviet WW2 general well-known as an operational strategist, although his name was resounded in many major campaigns of the German-Soviet War, yet few focused on analyze his contribution to military theories and the Soviet victory.

Li Jing (李靖) — a famous Chinese Tang dynasty general reputed for the merit of the subjugation of Gokturks (突厥) in AD 630.
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,538
#7
Stonewall Jackson is at least as overrated as Rommel.

He had moments of brilliance, but also moments where he was not very impressive at all. (ex. the entirety of the Seven Days). While he could be quite skilled operationally, he was also mediocre as a tactician.

Stonewall Jackson was not a military genius. He was not the greatest general in American military history. He was not even the greatest general to see military service in the American Civil War. Grant, Lee, and Winfield Scott were all better.
 
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Jul 2018
292
London
#8
Sin Rip (申砬) — renowned for his foolhardy "cavalry charge" against the ferocious Japanese arquebuses fire in Tangumdae (彈琴臺).

Alexander Sukorov — the Russian great military commander in the pre-Napoleonic Era, extremely favored the "bayonet charge" since it represents the infantry's real spirit.

Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝賴) — too many people only focused on his blunder in Nagashino, neglected his other campaigns / battles. Many perhaps did not even know he ever "defeated" Oda Nobunaga in the Battle of Akechi (AD 1574) and conquered the impregnable Takatenjin Castle (AD 1574) for which even his father had failed to subdue !

Suleiman the Magnificent — I really never see many people discussed his military command.

Nikolai Vatutin — a famous Soviet WW2 general well-known as an operational strategist, although his name was resounded in many major campaigns of the German-Soviet War, yet few focused on analyze his contribution to military theories and the Soviet victory.

Li Jing (李靖) — a famous Chinese Tang dynasty general reputed for the merit of the subjugation of Gokturks (突厥) in AD 630.
Posts like this make me realize how little I know ...
 
Jun 2017
2,881
Connecticut
#9
Ranking the three I know enough on to comment, don't know enough about the other two. Despise Jackson and Petain but Rommel is pretty overrated and his accomplishments pale compared to that of the other two. Jackson's campaign was something I don't think could have been easily replicated by someone else and Petain found success in an era where failure was the norm.

1)Jackson
2)Petain
3)Rommel

I despise the Confederacy but the reason the Confederacy lasted long enough to kill so many people is because it had such an talented officer corps and Jackson likely was the most talented of the whole bunch including Lee, at least as a corps commander though we never got to see how his tactical prowess would have translated to him leading a larger force(the fact he was holding off larger armies with such a small force though kind of makes that point irrelevant but it's part of the whole Lee v Jackson debate nonetheless). While Lee's highlights get most of the attention, Jackson's campaign in the Shennodoah Valley in early 1862 with a tiny army against several Union forces before Lee even was in charge might have been the most impressive military performance in the Civil War and was part of the reason it took the Union almost a year to head towards Richmond for a second time.
 
Sep 2016
1,125
Georgia
#10
Rommel less discussed ? He is one of the most over-hyped military commanders ever. Mainly by the British and Americans, which doesn't surprise me.
 

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