Reading Ancient Greece - Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon...?

#1
Hi all,

First time post here. I have recently been reading on Ancient Greece in a somewhat chronological way.

I have read Herodotus, Thucydides and am about to finish Xenophon's Hellenica. I know this only an approximately chronological sequence, and that Xenophon has his issues, but I was wondering what I should read next.

Any advice - specific books or general thoughts - very much appreciated.

Alex
 
Sep 2015
351
Greece
#2
Hi all,

First time post here. I have recently been reading on Ancient Greece in a somewhat chronological way.

I have read Herodotus, Thucydides and am about to finish Xenophon's Hellenica. I know this only an approximately chronological sequence, and that Xenophon has his issues, but I was wondering what I should read next.

Any advice - specific books or general thoughts - very much appreciated.

Alex
Aesop's fables? Iliad? Heraclitus!
 
May 2015
718
Sweden
#6
Diodorus Siculus covers the period that follows Xenophons Hellenica as well as the period before and much later. You can just jump to Book XVI and read from there.
 
Nov 2012
429
Wiltshire
#7
You could try Xenophon's Agesilaus. It's about a Spartan king named Agesilaus, who died in 360 B.C., and therefore follows up the Anabasis very closely.
 
Feb 2011
300
NY, NY
#9
I really like bedb's suggestion of the Parallel Lives, but you can rev up Polybius if you take him up on this because the Roman entries are down the line from the Greek ones and will kind'a fall into place with not much gap as Time flies.

Happy reading.
 
Aug 2014
951
United States of America
#10
I second Bares' suggestion of Diodorus Siculus. He wrote in the 1st century BCE but he covers the beginning of the Hellenistic period. There is a gap in surviving contemporaneous accounts of any of Greek history after Xenophon. Diodorus collected the accounts available to him on Greek history and formed a narrative. Most modern historians agree that Diodorus did so rather uncritically, thus leaving a lot unchanged and virtually preserving these narratives from the 4th century BCE onwards. I believe that his sources do include those of soldiers who were on campaign with Alexander. Regardless, Diodorus presents us this history and forms a bridge for us between late Classical Greek and late Roman Republic sources.

Dio Cassius (aka Dio Coccianus), who lived in the 2nd-3rd centuries CE, tried to write a complete history of the Romans. His "Roman History" covers, more or less, from Rome's founding in 753 BCE to 229 CE.

You could follow up with Polybius, who is trying to explain why Rome grew to hegemony in the 3rd-2nd centuries BCE. The surviving bits of Appian describe Roman civil wars in the 1st century BCE.
 

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