Real world examples of capitalism/socialism

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,453
#41
Even the most Communist of countries used money. I don't think anyone has been paid in credits or goods in very long time. Money is just too convient.

Even the most Communist of countries recognized that highly trained professionals had to enjoy a better life than factory or agricultural workers. No one would bother going to school for all of those years if there wasn't some kind of tangible reward.
Sorry, realized the distinction was not clear- in a communist system everyone that does the same job is paid the same as you noted obviously there exists a specialization of skills but where the theory broke down is that some doctors worked harder/better/less/worse than others but received the same pay if doing the same job (in theory, rarely worked that way exactly).

Sure every communist attempt has used money but the concept is a bit different where it is a unit of account, a store of value, and somewhat of a medium of exchange though ration cards for many goods were required in lieu of money. In the future with blockchain or other technology money as a medium of exchange will be subject to political control and thus become something other than money for many who want to acquire goods deemed politically undesirable.
 
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Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,380
Dispargum
#42
... though ration cards for many goods were required in lieu of money. In the future with blockchain or other technology money as a medium of exchange will be subject to political control and thus become something other than money for many who want to acquire goods deemed politically undesirable.
Ration cards were used in lieu of money or in addition to money? I don't know if there is a difference or not. Ration cards are used to ensure that everyone has access to scarce goods. The US used rationing during WW2 and some of the Western European countries still used ration cards for some products into the 1980s and 1990s.

In the 19th century, farmers bought most of their goods on credit and at harvest time paid off their bills from the last year. This meant that there was a record of everything the farmer bought. As the population became more urban and more people worked for weekly wages, cash replaced credit and cash is anonymous. As we move away from cash again, we're going back to systems of exchange that leave a paper trail behind. Our purchases are no longer anonymous, but it's not the first time that has been true.
 
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