Reconstruction of war junks of 16CE

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,778
United States
Does this means that FaGong and Hongyipao have something common? What is the difference, if any?
They were both originally derived from European culverins. The fagong appears to have some native features (such as the bulb shape around the chamber).

According to the Great Ming Military blog after the introduction of the hongyipao the fagong was merely a lighter equivalent of it.

Fa Gong (發熕) | Great Ming Military
 
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Dec 2018
70
Singapore
They were both originally derived from European culverins. The fagong appears to have some native features (such as the bulb shape around the chamber).

According to the Great Ming Military blog after the introduction of the hongyipao the fagong was merely a lighter equivalent of it.

Fa Gong (發熕) | Great Ming Military
Very interesting website, thanks.
Now I can consider Wu Di Shen Fei Pao as a bow gun on next project- interesting, and reference is available! Any idea what naval carriage could be used for this? I assume that it is too big for swivel gun-also there are a rings on picture typical for fixing on carriage.
 

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,778
United States
Very interesting website, thanks.
Now I can consider Wu Di Shen Fei Pao as a bow gun on next project- interesting, and reference is available! Any idea what naval carriage could be used for this? I assume that it is too big for swivel gun-also there are a rings on picture typical for fixing on carriage.
Sadly no, I'm not actually too familiar with Chinese firearms, at least compared to what I know about the Korean ones.
 
Jul 2015
286
Japari Park
Welcome to our discussion and Thank you for help- I don't have this image, and it is very informative. Will appreciate any additional information!
My project relates to second half of 16CE deliberately- I would like to exclude Hongyipao from consideration at the moment. So, by my opinion, Dajiangjunpao have a right to be there.
About arrangement on board - Agree that broadside battery is not a style, so for Fuchuan ship i plan 1 big Dajiangjunpao (or Fagong?) on bow , and 6 Folangji on board (3+3). Problem is with carriage- too big Folangji cannot be a swivel gun. So, if i don't find the answer- there will be relatively small Folangji.

Wheeled gun carriage is on your picture you publish here!
As far as I can remember, Dajiangjunpao was an exclusively land-based cannon.
The wheeled carriage was certainly used, but they were "uncommon".
 
Dec 2018
70
Singapore
As far as I can remember, Dajiangjunpao was an exclusively land-based cannon.
The wheeled carriage was certainly used, but they were "uncommon".
Interesting opinion, and new for me.
Any reasons why Dajiangjunpao cannot be used on board? Any references, any sources to read?
Appreciate your advice, especially if you know about common naval guns of that period.
 
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Jul 2015
286
Japari Park
Interesting opinion, and new for me.
Any reasons why Dajiangjunpao cannot be used on board? Any references, any sources to read?
Appreciate your advice, especially if you know about common naval guns of that period.
Mostly because I haven't seen Dajiangjunpao listed among naval armament of any period (throughout Ming Dynasty). It's was mostly either Fagong, Wudi Dajiangjunpao (the giant breechloading gun), or Red Barbarian cannon during later period.

I don't think there was any particular reason they couldn't use Dajiangjunpao on a ship, they just didn't. Dajiangjunpao (the iron version) was first designed in 1585 to defend against the nomads in the north. By that time, the Japanese pirates were already dealt with, Yu Dayou already passed away, and Qi Jiguang was fired from his job. The next time Ming Dynasty faced significant naval challenge, they already had access to Red Barbarian cannon.

EDIT
I was wrong when I assume Wankouchong as lightweight. A Wankouchong dated to 1553 found in Quanzhou weighs 160kg.
 
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