Religious Deterrant

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
PADDYBOY,

Gandhi himself was a pacifist of course, but I did not know that Hindu philosophy is especially pacific.
 

PADDYBOY

Historum Emeritas
Jan 2007
6,545
Scotland
I'm not a student of Hindu philosophy, but Gandhi was, and I expect it probably had an influence on his way of thinking, amongst other things.
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
By all means. Gandhi ranks among pacifists above even Tolstoy (with whom he corresponded) and Martin Luther King Jr. - in my humble opinion.

I think the pacifistic teachings of any religion amount to what one makes of them. I think Jainism is the most explicitly pacific of the religions.
 

PADDYBOY

Historum Emeritas
Jan 2007
6,545
Scotland
Yep.
And I suppose the millions of people who followed Gandhi were pacifists too ?
Never having had the guts to be a pacifist myself, I wouldn't know

What about you Lucius, do you think you could ever be brave enough to, uh, not fight back ?
 

Lucius

Forum Staff
Jan 2007
16,363
Nebraska
What about you Lucius, do you think you could ever be brave enough to, uh, not fight back ?
I very seriously doubt it. I'd probably convince myself that passive resistance is an oxymoron and just stay home and watch it on TV. If it started to work out, I'd be convincing myself that staying home and watching it on TV counts as passive resistance too. Presumably I'd have enough brains not to mention that to anyone else.

please excuse my ignorance, but what is Jainism ??
Here's a good summary -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/jainism/
 

PADDYBOY

Historum Emeritas
Jan 2007
6,545
Scotland
Don't presume anything Lucius, the pacifists have probably read your reply by now and they'll be round your house tomorrow morning to stick their tongues out at you :p :p :p :p :p :p :p
 

Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
Would the "Peace of God" or "Truce of God" fall into that category???

This was an attempt by the Church (in medieval times) to try and curb violence, which was prevalent at the time.
I don't really know. Pax Dei - or, more specifically, Treuga Dei - is complex. It could very well be seen as a gambit by the church to achieve monopolization of the legitimate use of force and thus, nothing more than an unsuccesful attempt at achieving supreme secular power in Europe. At the same time as Pax Dei was campaigning against the growing consolidation (by war) of secular power into proto-nations, the church was also sponsoring and legitimizing other conflicts; for instance, only a few decades into the Peace of God Movement - basically at its height - the church threw its support behind the Norman Conquest of England, a thoroughly Christian entity, and again a few decades later, behind the invasion of Ireland by the Normans (an even more thoroughly Christian entity). There are many other examples.
 
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