Remembering the fallen...

Aug 2006
583
Waltheofshire
Remembrance Sunday, or Armistice Day, 11th minute of the 11th hour of the 11th month (1918), is the day we will and always should remember the 65 million WWI dead.

The horror of that suddenly-modern warfare is quite often too horrific to put into words, but the killing rate was 5,600 men per day.

In Britain alone, 743,000 men were slaughtered in those four bloody years (a further 150,000 died of Spanish Influenza during a horrific pandemic that killed 25-50 million worldwide)- and several thousand men from various nationalities were killed on the very last day of WWI.

Of course, many other brutal wars, campaigns and conflicts have scarred humanity since, even today.

Lest we forget...
 

galteeman

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
2,198
Sodom and Begorrah
[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbfUzBRRS5E"]YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.[/ame]
 

avon

Forum Staff
May 2008
14,253
Futility

Move him into the sun -
Gently its touch awoke him once,
At home, whispering of fields unsown.
Always it woke him, even in France,
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now
The kind old sun will know.

Think how it wakes the seeds, -
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.
Are limbs, so dear-achieved, are sides,
Full-nerved, - still warm, - too hard to stir?
Was it for this the clay grew tall?
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth's sleep at all?

- Wilfred Owen
 
Sep 2008
268
Orkney, United Kingdom
Avon, how did you know that this is one of my favourite poems by Wilfred Owen?

Even though Remembrance Day was originally started for those who fell in WW1, we of course remember those who died in other conflicts. I don't know if any other member has lost a family member through war, but I never knew my grandfather, he was killed at Dunkirk (17 years before I was born). It is from this incident in history that I learnt at an early age that the victims of war are the living as well the dead. My mother was 8 when this happened, she hated the Germans till the day she died in 2003.
 
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avon

Forum Staff
May 2008
14,253
Avon, how did you know that this is one of my favourite poems by Wilfred Owen?
Something we most likely share with a large number of others!! :)

... I learnt at an early age that the victims of war are the living as well the dead. My mother was 8 when this happened, she hated the Germans till the day she died in 2003.
The conventional equivalent of radioactive contamination. W'ere it be minds, worldviews or the soil itself, war poisons. Full stop.

Here's a thought though: does Remembrance Day, through some implicit but unintended machination of the mind, in some way abet this poisoning??
 
Sep 2008
268
Orkney, United Kingdom
I think 'yes', but indirectly, it makes a lot of people feel patriotic and proud. Which then the dead on our side become heros and the dead of the enemy villians. I don't think that people in Britain truly understand the carnage of true warfare anymore so to some it also leaves a romantic come heroic thing in their minds.
 

avon

Forum Staff
May 2008
14,253
I think 'yes', but indirectly, it makes a lot of people feel patriotic and proud. Which then the dead on our side become heros and the dead of the enemy villians. I don't think that people in Britain truly understand the carnage of true warfare anymore so to some it also leaves a romantic come heroic thing in their minds.
I'm not sure that the 'enemy' dead become villians, rather the 'evil' men who start wars most likely. However, I do agree that patriotism is the result for many. It is perhaps instructive (or perhaps not) that the Nazis were very serious about honouring war dead. Acts of memorial and rememberance were big affairs in Nazi Germany with Goebbels being an especially important proponant of these ceremonies. The Nazis were also careful of the graves of war dead generally. There are very instances during WWII of the German forces desecrating war graves or war memorials. Given that very little else was likely to escape vandalism or destruction, this is perhaps surprising.
 
Oct 2008
147
The Treasure: No. 5, The Soldier
If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.


And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

By Rupert Brooke
 

Son of Cathal

Ad Honorem
Oct 2008
4,311
The Bright Center of the Universe
Lest we forget

I am representing my school at a remembrance ceremony tomorrow. It is an honor to do so