Richard The Lionheart - and how did he get his name

Theodoric

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Mar 2012
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Yötebory Sveriya
Richard was actually one of the poorer Kings of England of the past 100 years or so. But he was a miracle worker in contrast to John whose reign over the Empire is remembered by outright rebellion against him in both Britain and continental Europe. The shambles of John’s lands were invaded by Prince Louis, John died around this time, and France gained control of vast regions that remain a part of its territory until this very day. Louis, was interestingly called “The Lion” - so in the tales of Robin Hood it is almost like a mashup of he and Richard and written as if he was successful in retaking England, but the reality is that John died and the Protector of England (Basically the Regent) William Marshall stopped Louis (Henry III was a child at the time) splitting the lands.

Prince Louis would reign a short time as Louis VIII in the 1220s
 

Theodoric

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Mar 2012
2,930
Yötebory Sveriya
Also, the first known ballad of Robin Hood came around in the 1400s, but the legend emerged in the later 13th earlier 14th century during the reign of Henry III's son Edward I "The Longshanks" of England, also the King who faced William Wallace. It makes me wonder if Robin Hood is a bit of an English take on a rebel against the crown because they were jealous that Scotland had one and they didn't.

Just a thought.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,391
Netherlands
Also, the first known ballad of Robin Hood came around in the 1400s, but the legend emerged in the later 13th earlier 14th century during the reign of Henry III's son Edward I "The Longshanks" of England, also the King who faced William Wallace. It makes me wonder if Robin Hood is a bit of an English take on a rebel against the crown because they were jealous that Scotland had one and they didn't.

Just a thought.
It is also the time that the cities started becoming prominent. Late 13th century we had Reynard the Fox and the Dutch/Flemish version was less than flattering for the nobles and clergy (though just as in Robin Hood, the rightful king was just and noble)
 
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Feb 2017
243
Devon, UK
Richard I was known for his chivalry. While overlooking castle defenses Richard I was shot with an arrow by a young boy, known by some as Pierre. Wounded Richard had Pierre brought before him, Richard granted Pierre freedom and some Gold. Richard later died of his wounds, but forgave his own killer the ultimate act of Christian piety.
And 'Pierre' if that was his name, was later flayed alive after Richard's death.

If you're looking for a 'parfit gentil knyghte' (to use Chaucer's satirical phrase) in Richard's reign celebrate William the Marshal instead (and he was no more chivalrous than served his purposes).

As for Robin Hood, he isn't (reliably) mentioned anywhere until the late 14th century and doesn't get linked to Richard's reign until the early 16th.
 
Feb 2017
243
Devon, UK
Also, the first known ballad of Robin Hood came around in the 1400s, but the legend emerged in the later 13th earlier 14th century during the reign of Henry III's son Edward I "The Longshanks" of England, also the King who faced William Wallace. It makes me wonder if Robin Hood is a bit of an English take on a rebel against the crown because they were jealous that Scotland had one and they didn't.

Just a thought.
The first chronicle references to Robin Hood (and Little John) appear in the 15th century and describe them as leaders of 'the dispossessed' following the de Monfort rebellion of the 1260s.

And if you really want to go down the rabbit hole of loopy theories, yes, there are apparently those who think William Wallace was 'the real' Robin Hood.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,391
Netherlands
And 'Pierre' if that was his name, was later flayed alive after Richard's death.

If you're looking for a 'parfit gentil knyghte' (to use Chaucer's satirical phrase) in Richard's reign celebrate William the Marshal instead (and he was no more chivalrous than served his purposes).

As for Robin Hood, he isn't (reliably) mentioned anywhere until the late 14th century and doesn't get linked to Richard's reign until the early 16th.
Don't know if it is true (probably not), but too good to factcheck. On his deathbed Henry II supposedly said: "Of all my children only the legitimate ones are bastards"
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,800
USA
Yeh, I remember in the Robin Hood tales King Richard was away on crusades and his brother John was oppressing the people.

He had a reputation for the crusades. He also died doing what generals today do, inspecting the situation at the front. It certainly showed courage.

From a modern perspective, some of his actions like ordering 3,000 POWs killed and sort of encouraging anti-Jewish riots and killings don't look so good. He spent almost all of his reign on crusade or fighting in France, and hardly any time in England. That was what made a great king at the time, but isn't looked on as well now. Crusades have been seen for the last 300 years as sort of insane.
Well it certainly is an interesting subject and there are a variety of opinions on the rule of Richard Inand the sort of moral person that Richard I was.

I have talked to a few modern day Englishman who do not like Richard I. Yet there are certainly royalists who respect the Lionheart. It was in the Victorian era that Englishman wanted to portray Richard as a noble and kind leader. I sort of fall in line with the Victorian era writers when it comes to these types of topics I very much enjoy what these informed scholars have to say about the Middle Ages.

I do not believe Richard I was some kind of anti-Jew though and I base this on the fact that the Brittanca encyclopedia makes no mention whatsoever of the allegations for example that Wikipedia makes against a number of Catholics of the Middle Ages. Wikipedia seems to have an issue here with false allegations against figures such as Richard I.

It is interesting to read up on the relationship between Richard the first and his brother John as well as his father Henry II
 
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JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,800
USA
And 'Pierre' if that was his name, was later flayed alive after Richard's death.

If you're looking for a 'parfit gentil knyghte' (to use Chaucer's satirical phrase) in Richard's reign celebrate William the Marshal instead (and he was no more chivalrous than served his purposes).

As for Robin Hood, he isn't (reliably) mentioned anywhere until the late 14th century and doesn't get linked to Richard's reign until the early 16th.
Well there are conflicting reports on this boy Pierre. It’s part of the legend of Richard the Lionheart. Some say that the boy was given gold and went on to live a good life but others say that some of Richard’s associates ignored Richard’s rule to let the boy live and killed the boy

I hear what you are saying. That being said I find it very interesting that during the middle ages there were stories spread about Robin Hood and Richard the lion heart that put these men in very good positions morally speaking. This goes to show us that in the middle ages there were Christian Europeans thinking about good values and trying to live a good life.

Isn’t it interesting that to this very day Richard the lion heart and Robin Hood are praised in film and literature.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,339
Yeh, Richard seems to have caused trouble by being nasty. That might have been partly why the defender of the castle aimed for him. Richard may have pardoned the boy who shot him, but he could not do much about it at that point, as the castle wasn't taken. After the castle was taken, all the defenders were hanged except for the shooter, who was flayed alive.

At his coronation, the Jews of England tried to give him a present. He said he didn't want any Jews at his coronation. That caused riots and murders of Jews. People thought the king supported that. That is one example, but he seemed to be nasty and cause trouble, perhaps without intending it.

King John destroyed his empire in France. The King of France was crowned King of England in London. Then John died while campaigning against the rebellion and French were expelled. England wasn't a major power again for 500 years. John was also hated by the aristocracy and the common people.
 
Sep 2014
1,211
Queens, NYC
Excuse me betgo, England was definitely a major power in the 14th century and for part of the 15th century.