Road Bridge from the USA to Europe

Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#91
'Possible' does not infer probable. A thing may be logically possible, but practically impossible

I have no problem believing it's possible. I have a huge problem believing it is remotely likely. That on the basis of cost and the question of who who is going to actually use it?

A bit of a difference between the English channel and the Atlantic Ocean . Not sure that any comparison is reasonable .

I'd really like to see bridge or tunnel between the South Australian coast across the few miles of Backstairs Passage, to Kangaroo Island, Australia's third largest Island ,with an area of 4405 km.

Technically; not a problem. Cost; expensive. Use; wide range. Chances; somewhere between Buckley's and none, or for the non Australians, Sweet Fanny Adams
 
Likes: JoanOfArc007
Jul 2016
7,751
USA
#92
To you and Johin on the history part

If one for whatever reason and it does not make any sense to be against this thread ...Thinks that it’s not historic for such an idea to take old is simply wrong. I’m not interested in doubters , sarcasm or similar.

Various proposals through human history have been doubted , mocked even derided ..so be it.



This would be history in the making. So perhaps the thread could be moved elsewhere. I’m fine if this thread is moved to a different section . But it’s surely fine here . If one does not like the idea Of a Road bridge connecting continents that’s totally fine the best bet would then be to not post in this thread.

The various safety concerns that have been brought up are 100% valid . But safety concerns have not stopped humanity from progressing in the technology and science departments. Under President Eisenhower the American interstate highway system grew greatly and I’m sure that people had their safety concerns.

Yes it is easier to fly from for example Spain to Florida or from New York City to London .

But why is it that folks take a cruise from New York City to London, the answer is because of curiosity of sailing the ocean.

Now imagine if great road bridges were built that would connect continents it would be a massive project of course but it’s something that could be very attractive to the adventurer
It's going to be hard to ever take anything you write seriously ever again after this thread, actions have consequences. :lol::lol::lol:
 
Likes: specul8
Jul 2016
7,751
USA
#93
A few disgruntled opinions do not negate the engineers in the videos and other posts of this thread whom say a intercontinental bridge or tunnel is possible in various parts of the world. The Channel Tunnel connecting England and France was quite a feat both socially and technologically considering the violent historic wars between England and France.

Ancient Geezer and specul8 it is real world Engineers whom have already connected France and England via the Channel Tunnel. Post all the non related comedy and bully type material you want, it is disagreed with by facts and Engineers .
I'm very curious. What is the biggest and most elaborate and expensive thing you've personally designed and built? Forget designed, just built.
 
Jan 2015
2,786
MD, USA
#94
A few disgruntled opinions do not negate the engineers in the videos and other posts of this thread whom say a intercontinental bridge or tunnel is possible in various parts of the world. The Channel Tunnel connecting England and France was quite a feat both socially and technologically considering the violent historic wars between England and France.

Ancient Geezer and specul8 it is real world Engineers whom have already connected France and England via the Channel Tunnel. Post all the non related comedy and bully type material you want, it is disagreed with by facts and Engineers .
I don't even know how to counter such a fantasy-filled post. Yes, one or two engineers in those videos said something along the lines of "Wouldn't that be neato", though we don't know what might have been edited out to get that quote on film. You still seem to be assuming that an "intercontinental bridge or tunnel" sweepingly includes the Chunnel, a Bering Strait crossing, and something that CROSSES THE ATLANTIC. Sorry, but those first two are in a completely different universe than the third, from a standpoint of construction and materials.

So far, all the *facts*, material, economic, and political, flatly refute the idea of anything being built across the Atlantic in the foreseeable future. Current materials and construction techniques will NOT be adequate; no one can afford it; and there is nothing like the necessary demand for it. Doesn't matter if an ENGINEER likes the idea.

Frankly, trying to claim a victory and call us bullies is a little offensive. All we did was point out that such a project can't be done in this world as we know it. You're the one who blithely assumes that the fundamentals of technology, economics, and human nature are all going to change to make it a high priority as well as a practicality. Playing the victim is kind of pathetic.

Matthew
 
Jul 2016
7,751
USA
#96
Engineers LOVE crazy ideas ,
building a bridge across oceans ,
making a rope lift to outer space ,How Space Elevators Will Work
drilling to the Earth mantle , Scientists plan to drill into the Earth's mantle for the first time
one should never ever let engineers loose with billion dollar in their pocket ,
they believe in dreams
never mind the consequences
That stuff is done largely by engineers in academia most concerned with theoretical aspects of engineering. Like the old adage, those who can't do, teach. Besides that, working on tough or impossible engineering problems works well to teach inquisitive students to think, to find solutions on their own, a key tenet of being an engineer.

But any engineer with practical experience in the aspects of concrete, strucutural, bridging, marine, etc, who also understand the realities and complexities of funding, budgeting, costs, will laugh at someone who seriously pitched that idea.

To do it with a remote chance of success would mean the largest construction project in human history, it'll dwarf the Great Wall or anything else since it'll all have to be built on water, either pontoons or by driving possibly score miles deep into trenches to plant pilings. And in the end, what do you get? Your took a simple and relatively cheap cruise on a container ship and replaced it with a dangerous, week long, completely unnecessary trucking expedition. What happens to the trucker who is halfway to the US and finds out a No'Easter is blowing in to smash the Eastern Seaboard with high winds, snow, ice, and massive waves at sea? Turn around? Pull over at the island sized service stations that will need to be built every couple hundred miles, for thousands of miles, that themselves will need housing for the full time employees that man the eateries, gas stations, auto shops, emergency services, construction personnel that will have to be permanently employed in running said bridge?

Why not add an additional challenge? Bridge the Atlantic...

With Q Tips.
 
Likes: specul8
Aug 2012
1,469
#97
I worry about the damage such an idea could do to the ocean. Humans have already caused a great deal of damage to the seas, and not just with things like dynamite fishing, but through improper dumping of plastic waste. The best we can do as a species is to leave the seas in peace, interacting with them only to engage in missions of discovery underwater. I am not a Luddite, and don't fear change or new ideas, but humanity must always respect the Earth before all else.
 
Jul 2016
7,751
USA
I worry about the damage such an idea could do to the ocean. Humans have already caused a great deal of damage to the seas, and not just with things like dynamite fishing, but through improper dumping of plastic waste. The best we can do as a species is to leave the seas in peace, interacting with them only to engage in missions of discovery underwater. I am not a Luddite, and don't fear change or new ideas, but humanity must always respect the Earth before all else.
Dynamite fishing is nothing, the issues come from long line and massive net fishing, especially in the magnitude done by the Chinese and Japanese, whose cultures thrive on fresh salt water fish.

The best we can do as a species is to leave the seas in peace, interacting with them only to engage in missions of discovery underwater.
This I'm having difficulty understanding. Are you implying that besides missions of scientific discovery, humans shouldn't involve themselves in the seas?
 

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